IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ein/tuecis/0506.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does it matter where patent citations come from? Inventor versus examiner citations in European patents

Author

Listed:
  • Criscuolo, P.

    (Tanaka Business School, Imperial College, London)

  • Verspagen, B.

    (ECIS, Eindhoven University of Technology)

Abstract

This paper investigates whether the distinction between patent citations added by the inventor or the examiner is relevant for the issue of geographical concentration of knowledge flows (as embodied in citations). The distinction between inventor and examiner citations enables us to work with a more refined citation indicator of knowledge flows. We use information in the search reports of patent examiners at the European Patent Office to construct our dataset of regional patenting in Europe, and apply various econometric models to investigate our research question. The findings point to a significant localization effect of inventor citations, after controlling for various other factors, and hence suggest that knowledge flows are indeed geographically concentrated. This holds true also for a sub-sample of patents owned by 169 large multinational enterprises (MNEs). The results for the sample of MNEs suggest that multinational firms seek out specific regional knowledge specializations (and hence at least partly reinforce geographical concentration), but are also able to transfer knowledge "easier" over larger distances.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Criscuolo, P. & Verspagen, B., 2005. "Does it matter where patent citations come from? Inventor versus examiner citations in European patents," Working Papers 05.06, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ein:tuecis:0506
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jaffe, Adam B & Fogarty, Michael S & Banks, Bruce A, 1998. "Evidence from Patents and Patent Citations on the Impact of NASA and Other Federal Labs on Commercial Innovation," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 183-205, June.
    2. Bart Verspagen & Wilfred Schoenmakers, 2004. "The spatial dimension of patenting by multinational firms in europe," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(1), pages 23-42, January.
    3. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg & Rebecca Henderson, 1993. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 577-598.
    4. Hausman, Jerry A & Newey, Whitney K, 1995. "Nonparametric Estimation of Exact Consumers Surplus and Deadweight Loss," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 63(6), pages 1445-1476, November.
    5. Breschi, Stefano & Lissoni, Francesco, 2001. "Knowledge Spillovers and Local Innovation Systems: A Critical Survey," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(4), pages 975-1005, December.
    6. Bottazzi, Laura & Peri, Giovanni, 2003. "Innovation and spillovers in regions: Evidence from European patent data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(4), pages 687-710, August.
    7. Adam Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg, 1999. "International Knowledge Flows: Evidence From Patent Citations," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1-2), pages 105-136.
    8. Akers, Noël J., 2000. "The referencing of prior art documents in European patents and applications," World Patent Information, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 309-315, December.
    9. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg, 1996. "Flows of Knowledge from Universities and Federal Labs: Modeling the Flowof Patent Citations Over Time and Across Institutional and Geographic Boundari," NBER Working Papers 5712, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. James R. Freeland & Jeffrey H. Moore, 1977. "Implications of Resource Directive Allocation Models for Organizational Design," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 23(10), pages 1050-1059, June.
    11. Maurseth, Per Botolf & Verspagen, Bart, 2002. " Knowledge Spillovers in Europe: A Patent Citations Analysis," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 104(4), pages 531-545, December.
    12. Kevin Morgan, 2004. "The exaggerated death of geography: learning, proximity and territorial innovation systems," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(1), pages 3-21, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Crespi, Gustavo & Criscuolo, Chiara & Haskel, Jonathan E. & Slaughter, Matthew, 2007. "Productivity growth, knowledge flows and spillovers," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19735, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Joaquín M. Azagra-Caro & Ignacio Fernández-de-Lucio & François Perruchas & Pauline Mattsson, 2009. "What do patent examiner inserted citations indicate for a region with low absorptive capacity?," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 80(2), pages 441-455, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    patent; European; citations;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ein:tuecis:0506. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ectuenl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.