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Industry Evolution in Developing Countries: the Indonesian Pulp and Paper Industry

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  • Dijk van, M.

    (ECIS, Eindhoven University of Technology)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Dijk van, M., 2003. "Industry Evolution in Developing Countries: the Indonesian Pulp and Paper Industry," Working Papers 03.02, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ein:tuecis:0302
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James R. Tybout, 2000. "Manufacturing Firms in Developing Countries: How Well Do They Do, and Why?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 11-44.
    2. Jeffrey James, 2002. "Technology, Globalization and Poverty," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2185.
    3. Klepper, Steven, 1997. "Industry Life Cycles," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, pages 145-181.
    4. Blomstrom, Magnus & Wolff, Edward N., 1997. "Growth in a dual economy," World Development, Elsevier, pages 1627-1637.
    5. Temple, Jonathan, 2001. "Growing into Trouble: Indonesia After 1966," CEPR Discussion Papers 2932, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Sleuwaegen, Leo & Goedhuys, Micheline, 2002. "Growth of firms in developing countries, evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 117-135.
    7. Bonaccorsi, Andrea & Giuri, Paola, 2000. "When shakeout doesn't occur: The evolution of the turboprop engine industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 847-870.
    8. Aron, Janine, 2000. "Growth and Institutions: A Review of the Evidence," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 15(1), pages 99-135, February.
    9. Johann Peter Murmann & Ernst Homburg, 2001. "special feature: Comparing evolutionary dynamics across different national settings: the case of the synthetic dye industry, 1857-1914," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 177-205.
    10. Klepper, Steven & Simons, Kenneth L, 1997. "Technological Extinctions of Industrial Firms: An Inquiry into Their Nature and Causes," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, pages 379-460.
    11. James Tybout, 1999. "Manufacturing Firms in Developing Countries: How Well Do They Do, and Why?," Development and Comp Systems 9906001, EconWPA, revised 10 Jun 1999.
    12. Utterback, James M & Abernathy, William J, 1975. "A dynamic model of process and product innovation," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 3(6), pages 639-656, December.
    13. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(02), pages 385-406, June.
    14. James R. Tybout, 2000. "Manufacturing Firms in Developing Countries: How Well Do They Do, and Why?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 11-44.
    15. George Fane, 1999. "Indonesian Economic Policies and Performance, 1960-98," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(5), pages 651-668, July.
    16. Klepper, Steven, 1996. "Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 562-583.
    17. Sachs, Jeffrey D. & Warner, Andrew M., 2001. "The curse of natural resources," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 827-838, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michiel Van Dijk & Adam Szirmai, 2006. "Technical efficiency and embodied technical change in the Indonesian pulp and paper industry," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 163-178.
    2. Michiel Van Dijk & Adam Szirmai, 2005. "Catch Up at the Micro-Level: Evidence from an Industry Case Study Using Manufacturing Census Data," DEGIT Conference Papers c010_038, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    3. Akçomak, İ. Semih & ter Weel, Bas, 2012. "The impact of social capital on crime: Evidence from the Netherlands," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 323-340.
    4. Silverberg, Gerald & Verspagen, Bart, 2007. "The size distribution of innovations revisited: An application of extreme value statistics to citation and value measures of patent significance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 139(2), pages 318-339, August.

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