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The Geography of Internet Adoption by Retailers

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  • Jesse W.J. Weltevreden

    ()

  • Oedzge A.L.C. Atzema

    ()

  • Koen Frenken

    ()

  • Karlijn de Kruijf
  • Frank G. van Oort

    ()

Abstract

Up till now, the literature on Internet adoption by retailers paid little attention to spatial variables. Using data on 27,000 retail outlets in the Netherlands, we investigate the geographical diffusion of Internet adoption by Dutch retailers. More precise, we examine to what extent retail Internet adoption differs between shopping centers, cities, and regions, while controlling for product and organizational variables. Results of the linear and multinomial logistic regressions suggest that shops at city centers are more likely to adopt the Internet than shops located at shopping centers at the bottom of the retail hierarchy. Furthermore, shops in large cities have a higher probability to adopt the Internet than shops in small cities. On the regional level, the likelihood of Internet adoption is higher for shops in core regions than for retail outlets in the periphery. In conclusion, geography seems to matter for retail Internet adoption.

Suggested Citation

  • Jesse W.J. Weltevreden & Oedzge A.L.C. Atzema & Koen Frenken & Karlijn de Kruijf & Frank G. van Oort, 2005. "The Geography of Internet Adoption by Retailers," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0510, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Sep 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:0510
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    File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg0510.pdf
    File Function: Version 19 September 2005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sinai, Todd & Waldfogel, Joel, 2004. "Geography and the Internet: is the Internet a substitute or a complement for cities?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 1-24, July.
    2. William P. Anderson & Lata Chatterjee & T.R. Lakshmanan, 2003. "E-commerce, Transportation, and Economic Geography," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(4), pages 415-432.
    3. Nelson, Philip, 1974. "Advertising as Information," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(4), pages 729-754, July/Aug..
    4. Andrew Currah, 2002. "Behind the web store: the organisational and spatial evolution of multichannel retailing in Toronto," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 34(8), pages 1411-1441, August.
    5. Nelson, Phillip, 1970. "Information and Consumer Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(2), pages 311-329, March-Apr.
    6. Klein, Lisa R., 1998. "Evaluating the Potential of Interactive Media through a New Lens: Search versus Experience Goods," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 195-203, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Margarita Billón & Roberto Ezcurra & Fernando Lera-López, 2008. "The Spatial Distribution of the Internet in the European Union: Does Geographical Proximity Matter?," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 119-142, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    evolutionary economics; internet adoption; retailing;

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