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Food Security in Asia and the Pacific: The Rapidly Changing Role of Rice

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  • Peter Timmer

Abstract

Food security in Asia and the Pacific presents a frustrating paradox. At one level, huge progress has been made in the past half century in bringing most of the population out of poverty and hunger. Measured by the key determinants of food security—improved availability, access, utilisation and stability—food security has never been at higher levels. Large pockets of food-insecure populations remain in the region, especially in South Asia, and continued efforts to reach these households are necessary. At the same time, food security strategies in Asia are mostly in disarray. Most countries are protecting their rice farmers and providing high price supports, but high rice prices hurt the vast majority of the poor. Continued efforts to stabilise rice prices are understandable politically and desirable economically, but much more open trade regimes for rice will help food security throughout the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Timmer, 2014. "Food Security in Asia and the Pacific: The Rapidly Changing Role of Rice," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies 201406, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:appswp:201406
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. C. Peter Timmer & David Dawe, 2007. "Managing Food Price Instability in Asia: A Macro Food Security Perspective ," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 1-18, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Arnold H. Fang, 2016. "Linkage between Rural Voters and Politicians: Effects on Rice Policies in the Philippines and Thailand," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(3), pages 505-517, September.
    2. Nguyen, Huy, 2014. "Crop diversification, economic performance and household’s behaviours Evidence from Vietnam," MPRA Paper 59090, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Pieters, Hannah & Swinnen, Johan, 2016. "Trading-off volatility and distortions? Food policy during price spikes," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 27-39.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food security; role of rice; Asia and the Pacific; price stablisation; behavioural political economy;

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