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Crowding Out Public Service Motivation

Author

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  • Yannis Georgellis

    ()

  • Elisabetta Iossa

    ()

  • Vurain Tabvuma

    ()

Abstract

Employing workers with Public Service Motivation (PSM) has been proposed as a means of improving performance in the public sector. There is, however, no conclusive evidence showing PSM among individuals. In this paper we attempt to firstly find evidence of PSM by investigating why people change jobs from the private to the public sector. Secondly we attempt to identify factors that crowd out PSM and thus hinder individuals with PSM from joining the public sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Yannis Georgellis & Elisabetta Iossa & Vurain Tabvuma, 2008. "Crowding Out Public Service Motivation," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 08-07, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
  • Handle: RePEc:edb:cedidp:08-07
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    References listed on IDEAS

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