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Optimal Bank Runs without Self-Fulfilling Prophecies

  • Haibin Zhu

    (Duke University)

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    This paper extends the standard Diamond-Dybvig model for a general equilibrium in which depositors make their withdrawal decisions sequentially and banks strategically choose their contracts. There is a unique Subgame Perfect Nash Equilibrium (SPNE) in the decentralized economy. Bank runs can occur when depositors perceive a low return on bank assets. When information is imperfect, bank runs can happen even when the economy is in a good state. A representative bank can earn positive profits in equilibrium due to the sequential service constraint. When there are several risky projects available, the high-risk technology may be chosen as a socially efficient solution.

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    Paper provided by Econometric Society in its series Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers with number 1753.

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    Date of creation: 01 Aug 2000
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ecm:wc2000:1753
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    1. Franklin Allen & Douglas Gale, 1976. "Optimal Financial Crises," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 97-01, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    2. Gul, Faruk & Lundholm, Russell, 1995. "Endogenous Timing and the Clustering of Agents' Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 1039-66, October.
    3. Alonso, Irasema, 1996. "On avoiding bank runs," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 73-87, February.
    4. Cooper, Russell & Ross, Thomas W., 1998. "Bank runs: Liquidity costs and investment distortions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 27-38, February.
    5. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1996. "The twin crises: the causes of banking and balance-of-payments problems," International Finance Discussion Papers 544, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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    7. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Pesenti, Paolo & Roubini, Nouriel, 1999. "What caused the Asian currency and financial crisis?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 305-373, October.
    8. Charles W. Calomiris, 1998. "The IMF's Imprudent Role As Lender of Last Resort," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 17(3), pages 275-294, Winter.
    9. Park, Sangkyun, 1997. "Risk-taking behavior of banks under regulation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 491-507, April.
    10. Diamond, Douglas W & Dybvig, Philip H, 1983. "Bank Runs, Deposit Insurance, and Liquidity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(3), pages 401-19, June.
    11. Chang, R. & Velasco, A., 1998. "Financial Crises in Emerging Markets: A Canonical Model," Working Papers 98-21, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    12. Walter B. Wriston, 1998. "Dumb Networks and Smart Capital," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 17(3), Winter.
    13. Krugman, Paul, 1979. "A Model of Balance-of-Payments Crises," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 11(3), pages 311-25, August.
    14. Russell Cooper & Thomas Ross, 1991. "BANK RUNS: Liquidity and Incentives," Papers 0022, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
    15. repec:tpr:qjecon:v:107:y:1992:i:3:p:797-817 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Russell Cooper & Thomas W. Ross, 2002. "Bank Runs: Deposit Insurance and Capital Requirements," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 55-72, February.
    17. Postlewaite, Andrew & Vives, Xavier, 1987. "Bank Runs as an Equilibrium Phenomenon," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 485-91, June.
    18. Ilan Goldfajn & Rodrigo O. Valdés, 1997. "Capital Flows and the Twin Crises: The Role of Liquidity," IMF Working Papers 97/87, International Monetary Fund.
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