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Creating Space for Effective Political Engagement in Development

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  • Andrews, Matthew

    (Harvard U)

Abstract

Most members of the development community, and especially those in multilateral and bilateral organizations, agree that politicians are centrally important to development. Fewer agree, however, on how to ensure effective political engagement in development programs and reforms. It is questionable whether many practitioners or theoreticians even have clear ideas about what effective political engagement looks like. Terms like political will and political commitment lack clarity and operational import; it is unclear what they are and even more unclear how to foster them. This chapter attempts to shed light on why such a key issue is poorly understood and to suggest ideas for thinking about it.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrews, Matthew, 2008. "Creating Space for Effective Political Engagement in Development," Working Paper Series rwp08-015, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp08-015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrews, Matt, 2013. "Explaining Positive Deviance in Public Sector Reforms in Development," Working Paper Series rwp13-040, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Matt Andrews, 2014. "An Ends-Means Approach to Looking at Governance," CID Working Papers 281, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    3. Raoul Blindenbacher & Bidjan Nashat, 2010. "The Black Box of Governmental Learning : The Learning Spiral - A Concept to Organize Learning in Governments," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2474.
    4. Andrews, Matt, 2014. "Why Distributed End Users Often Limit Public Financial Management Reform Success," Working Paper Series rwp14-026, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    5. Andrews, Matt, 2013. "Going beyond Heroic-Leaders in Development," Working Paper Series rwp13-021, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    6. Matt Andrews, 2014. "Why Distributed End Users Often Limit Public Financial Management Reform Success," CID Working Papers 283, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    7. Andrews, Matt, 2013. "How Do Governments Get Great?," Working Paper Series rwp13-020, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    8. Andrews, Matt, 2015. "Explaining Positive Deviance in Public Sector Reforms in Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 197-208.
    9. Andrews, Matt, 2014. "An Ends-Means Approach to Looking at Governance," Working Paper Series rwp14-022, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    10. Matt Andrews, 2013. "Explaining Positive Deviance in Public Sector Reforms in Development," CID Working Papers 267, Center for International Development at Harvard University.

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