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Are the Smart Kids More Rational ?

  • Sabrina Bruyneel
  • Laurens Cherchye
  • Sam Cosaert
  • Bram De Rock
  • Siegfried Dewitte

We conducted an experiment to collect data on consumption decisions made by children of different age categories. In particular, our experiment involves unsophisticated discrete consumption choices,and we present a rationality test that is specially designed for the resulting choice data. Our firstconclusion is that, in general, the observed children's consumption behavior is largely irrational. Next, we also investigate the relationship between the degree of rationality and the children's characteristics.Specically, we use teacher based assessments on several personal characteristics to investigate whether and to what extent smart children tend to behave more rational. Here, our main conclusion is that it is important to recognize the multidimensional nature of intelligence to obtain a balanced insight into the effect of intelligence on rationality.

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Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series Working Papers ECARES with number ECARES 2012-050.

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Length: 15 p.
Date of creation: Dec 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/134951
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  16. John, Deborah Roedder, 1999. " Consumer Socialization of Children: A Retrospective Look at Twenty-Five Years of Research," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(3), pages 183-213, December.
  17. Sippel, Reinhard, 1997. "An Experiment on the Pure Theory of Consumer's Behaviour," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(444), pages 1431-44, September.
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  22. Sabrina Bruyneel & Laurens Cherchye & Bram De Rock, 2012. "Collective consumption models with restricted bargaining weights: an empirical assessment based on experimental data," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 395-421, September.
  23. Lisa Farrell & Michael A. Shields, 2007. "Children as consumers: investigating child diary expenditure data," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(2), pages 445-467, May.
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