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Legal Profit-Sharing: Shifting the Tax Burden in a Dual Economy




What are the consequences of laws imposing profit-sharing rates in the compensation of all forms of labor, when only a limited share of the productive sector is really making profit ? This problem is examined in the case of competitive labor markets, when firms of the profitable sector are facing a predetermined participation constraint. The proposed model details how legal profit-sharing contracts offer a form of evasion from wage-based social contributions in permitting substitution of wages with contingent claims on profits. Labor contracts are examined in a context in which effort is monitored or in which free-riding effects thwart the incentive effects of profit-sharing.

Suggested Citation

  • Contensou, François, 2004. "Legal Profit-Sharing: Shifting the Tax Burden in a Dual Economy," ESSEC Working Papers DR 04011, ESSEC Research Center, ESSEC Business School.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebg:essewp:dr-04011

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Edward P. Lazear, 2000. "The Power of Incentives," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 410-414, May.
    2. Canice Prendergast, 1999. "The Provision of Incentives in Firms," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 7-63, March.
    3. Bensaid, Bernard & Gary-Bobo, Robert J., 1991. "Negotiation of profit-sharing contracts in industry," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 1069-1085, July.
    4. Bengt Holmstrom, 1982. "Moral Hazard in Teams," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 13(2), pages 324-340, Autumn.
    5. Kandel, Eugene & Lazear, Edward P, 1992. "Peer Pressure and Partnerships," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 801-817, August.
    6. Holmstrom, Bengt & Milgrom, Paul, 1987. "Aggregation and Linearity in the Provision of Intertemporal Incentives," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 303-328, March.
    7. A. B. Atkinson, 1999. "The Economic Consequences of Rolling Back the Welfare State," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262011719, July.
    8. Bengt Holmstrom, 1979. "Moral Hazard and Observability," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 74-91, Spring.
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    More about this item


    Profit-sharing; Incentives; Labor contract;

    JEL classification:

    • H30 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - General
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law

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