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Multistage Information Transmission with Voluntary Monetary Transfer

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  • Hitoshi Sadakane

Abstract

We analyze a cheap talk model in which an informed sender and an uninformed receiver engage in finite-period communication before the receiver chooses a project. During the communication phase, in each period, the sender sends a cheap talk message and the receiver voluntarily pays money for the message she receives. Our results show that combining multistage information transmission with the receiver's voluntary payments can improve welfare. Moreover, we find an upper bound of the receiver's equilibrium payoff and provide a sufficient condition for it to be approximated by the receiver's equilibrium payoff. This result shows that multistage information transmission with voluntary monetary transfer can be more beneficial for the receiver than a wide class of other communication protocols (e.g., mediation and arbitration).

Suggested Citation

  • Hitoshi Sadakane, 2017. "Multistage Information Transmission with Voluntary Monetary Transfer," ISER Discussion Paper 1006rr, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University, revised Jan 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:1006rr
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    File URL: https://www.iser.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/dp/2017/DP1006RR.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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