IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/dls/wpaper/0206.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Distributive Implications of Fertility Changes in Latin America

Author

Listed:
  • Nicolas Badaracco

    (CEDLAS - UNLP)

  • Leonardo Gasparini

    (CEDLAS - UNLP)

  • Mariana Marchionni

    (CEDLAS - UNLP)

Abstract

Fertility rates significantly fell over the last decades in Latin America. In order to assess the extent to which these changes contributed to the observed reduction in income poverty and inequality we apply microeconometric decompositions to microdata from national household surveys from seven Latin American countries. We find that changes in fertility rates were associated to a non-negligible reduction in inequality and poverty in the region. The main channel was straightforward: lower fertility implied smaller families and hence larger per capita incomes. Lower fertility also fostered labor force participation, especially among women, which contributed to the reduction of poverty and inequality in most countries, although the size of this effect was smaller.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolas Badaracco & Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni, 2017. "Distributive Implications of Fertility Changes in Latin America," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0206, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  • Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0206
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cedlas.econo.unlp.edu.ar/archivos_upload/doc_cedlas206.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mariana Marchionni & Leonardo Gasparini, 2007. "Tracing out the effects of demographic changes on the income distribution," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 5(1), pages 97-114, April.
    2. Cornia, Giovanni Andrea (ed.), 2014. "Falling Inequality in Latin America: Policy Changes and Lessons," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198701804.
    3. Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni & Walter Sosa Escudero, 2000. "Characterization of inequality changes through microeconometric decompositions. The case of Greater Buenos Aires," IIE, Working Papers 025, IIE, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    4. Timothy W. Guinnane, 2011. "The Historical Fertility Transition: A Guide for Economists," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 589-614, September.
    5. Garganta, Santiago & Gasparini, Leonardo, 2015. "The impact of a social program on labor informality: The case of AUH in Argentina," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 99-110.
    6. Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni, 2015. "Bridging Gender Gaps? The Rise and Deceleration of Female Labor Force Participation in Latin America: An overview," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0185, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Leonardo Gasparini, 2019. "La Desigualdad en su Laberinto: Hechos y Perspectivas sobre Desigualdad de Ingresos en América Latina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0256, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    2. Santiago Garganta & Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni & Mariano Tappatá, 2017. "The Effect of Cash Transfers on Fertility: Evidence from Argentina," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(1), pages 1-24, February.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Nicolás Badaracco, 2014. "Fecundidad y Cambios Distributivos en América Latina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0173, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    2. Monserrat Bustelo, 2004. "Caracterización de los Cambios en la Desigualdad y la Pobreza en Argentina Haciendo Uso de Técnicas de Descomposiciones Microeconometricas (1992-2001)," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0013, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    3. Guido Neidhöfer & Miguel Niño‐Zarazúa, 2019. "The Long(er)‐Term Impacts of Chile Solidario on Human Capital and Labor Income," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 45(S1), pages 209-244, December.
    4. Veronica Amarante, 2017. "Inequality and Household Size: A Microsimulation for Uruguay," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 10(1), pages 73-105.
    5. Santiago Garganta & Leonardo Gasparini & Mariana Marchionni, 2017. "Cash transfers and female labor force participation: the case of AUH in Argentina," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-22, December.
    6. Barnes, Geoffrey & Guinnane, Timothy W., 2010. "Social Class and the Fertility Transition: A Critical Comment on the Statistical Results Reported in Simon Szreter's Fertility, Class and Gender in Great Britain, 1860-1940," Working Papers 87, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    7. Javier Alejo & Nicolás Badaracco, 2015. "Counterfactual Distributions in Bivariate Models—A Conditional Quantile Approach," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(4), pages 1-14, November.
    8. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Neil, 2016. "The Child Quality-Quantity Tradeoff, England, 1780-1880: A Fundamental Component of the Economic Theory of Growth is Missing," CEPR Discussion Papers 11232, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Mauricio De Rosa, 2018. "Wealth distribution in Uruguay: capitalizing incomes in the dark," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 18-07, Instituto de Economia - IECON.
    10. Louise Rawlings & Stephen J. Robson & Pauline Ding, 2016. "Socioeconomic Response by Age Group to the Australian Baby Bonus: A Multivariate Analysis of Birth Data from 2001-13," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 19(2), pages 111-129.
    11. James Foreman-Peck & Peng Zhou, 2021. "Fertility versus productivity: a model of growth with evolutionary equilibria," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 34(3), pages 1073-1104, July.
    12. Timothy W. Guinnane & Sheilagh C. Ogilvie, 2013. "A Two-Tiered Demographic System: "Insiders" and "Outsiders" in Three Swabian Communities, 1558-1914," Working Papers 1021, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    13. Huang, Wei & Lei, Xiaoyan & Sun, Ang, 2015. "The Great Expectations: Impact of One-Child Policy on Education of Girls," IZA Discussion Papers 9301, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Robert D Osei & Jukka Pirttilä & Pia Rattenhuber, 2019. "Quantifying the Impacts of Expanding Social Protection on Efficiency and Equity: Evidence from a Behavioral Microsimulation Model for Ghana," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 12(1), pages 105-123.
    15. Robert Fenge & Beatrice Scheubel, 2013. "Pensions and Fertility: Back to the Roots - The Introduction of Bismarck's Pension Scheme and the European Fertility Decline," CESifo Working Paper Series 4383, CESifo.
    16. H. Xavier Jara & David Rodriguez, 2019. "Financial disincentives to formal work: Evidence from Ecuador and Colombia," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-14, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    17. Sascha Becker & Francesco Cinnirella & Ludger Woessmann, 2010. "The trade-off between fertility and education: evidence from before the demographic transition," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 177-204, September.
    18. Vincent Bignon & Cecilia Garcia-Peñalosa, 2016. "Protectionism and the Education-Fertility Trade-off in Late 19th Century France," AMSE Working Papers 1604, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France, revised Jan 2016.
    19. Geoffrey A. Barnes & Timothy W. Guinnane, 2012. "Social class and the fertility transition: a critical comment on the statistical results reported in Simon Szreter's Fertility, class and gender in Britain, 1860–1940," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(4), pages 1267-1279, November.
    20. Paula Bustos, 2011. "Trade Liberalization, Exports, and Technology Upgrading: Evidence on the Impact of MERCOSUR on Argentinian Firms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 304-340, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0206. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/funlpar.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Ana Pacheco (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/funlpar.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.