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Linking Natural Gas Markets: Is LNG Doing Its Job?

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  • Anne Neumann

Abstract

The increase in liquefied natural gas trade has accelerated the integration of previously segmented markets in North America, Europe, and Asia. This paper provides evidence on the integration of the transatlantic natural gas market. We test the theoretical proposition that in integrating markets commodity prices should move closer than before. Using 2,059 pairs of daily spot prices for natural gas in North America and Europe we investigate price dynamics covering the period from 1999 until 2008. We apply the Kalman Filter technique to gain detailed information on trends inherent over time. Results suggest an increasing convergence of spot prices on either side of the Atlantic Basin.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Neumann, 2008. "Linking Natural Gas Markets: Is LNG Doing Its Job?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 822, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp822
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Cuddington & Zhongmin Wang, 2006. "Assessing the Degree of Spot Market Integration for U.S. Natural Gas: Evidence from Daily Price Data," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 195-210, March.
    2. Apostolos Serletis & Ricardo Rangel-Ruiz, 2007. "Testing for Common Features in North American Energy Markets," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Quantitative And Empirical Analysis Of Energy Markets, chapter 14, pages 172-187 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    5. Asche, Frank & Osmundsen, Petter & Tveteras, Ragnar, 2002. "European market integration for gas? Volume flexibility and political risk," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 249-265, May.
    6. Anne Neumann & Boriss Siliverstovs & Christian von Hirschhausen, 2006. "Convergence of European spot market prices for natural gas? A real-time analysis of market integration using the Kalman Filter," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(11), pages 727-732.
    7. Stephen P. A. Brown & Mine K. Yucel, 2008. "What Drives Natural Gas Prices?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 45-60.
    8. Siliverstovs, Boriss & L'Hegaret, Guillaume & Neumann, Anne & von Hirschhausen, Christian, 2005. "International market integration for natural gas? A cointegration analysis of prices in Europe, North America and Japan," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 603-615, July.
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    11. Hall, S G & Robertson, D & Wickens, M R, 1992. "Measuring Convergence of the EC Economies," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 60(0), pages 99-111, Supplemen.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Market integration; spot markets; LNG; natural gas;

    JEL classification:

    • L95 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Gas Utilities; Pipelines; Water Utilities
    • Q49 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Other
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

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