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A Computable General Equilibrium Assessment of a Developing Country Joining an Annex B Emission Permit Market


  • Claudia Kemfert
  • Hans Kremers


During the last years, the developing regions have come under increased pressure by the developed countries, in particular the USA, to join the international effort in global greenhouse gas abatement. On the one hand, the participation of the developing regions would offer the developed world with low cost opportunities for abatement. On the other hand,the economies of some developed regions such as China and India exhibit such fast growth that they are expected to be responsible for a significant part of future emissions during the next decade. The latter regions object to the imposition of emission targets on their economy as it would significantly hamper their economic growth. This paper focusses on the consequences of certain proposals to set emission targets for developing countries, here China. One of these proposals follows the USA by letting China accept its projected "Business-as-Usual" emission level for 2012 as its target. A proposal by the Center for Clean Air Policy takes more consideration for the viewpoint of the developing countries by imposing a so-called "growth-baseline" for China, where a target is set on its emission effciency.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Kemfert & Hans Kremers, 2004. "A Computable General Equilibrium Assessment of a Developing Country Joining an Annex B Emission Permit Market," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 454, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp454

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Paul M. Bernstein & W. David Montgomery & Thomas F. Rutherford & Gui-Fang Yang, 1999. "Effects of Restrictions on International Permit Trading: The MS-MRT Model," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 221-256.
    2. Manne, Alan & Mendelsohn, Robert & Richels, Richard, 1995. "MERGE : A model for evaluating regional and global effects of GHG reduction policies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 17-34, January.
    3. Robert J. Barro & Paul Romer, 1993. "Economic Growth," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number barr93-1, January.
      • Robert J. Barro & Paul M. Romer, 1991. "Economic Growth," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number barr91-1, January.
    4. Jensen, Jesper & Rasmussen, Tobias N., 2000. "Allocation of CO2 Emissions Permits: A General Equilibrium Analysis of Policy Instruments," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 111-136, September.
    5. ZhongXiang Zhang, 2000. "The design and implementation of an international trading scheme for greenhouse gas emissions," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 18(3), pages 321-337, June.
    6. Kemfert, Claudia & Zhang, ZhongXiang, 2003. "Linking developing country's cooperation on climate control with industrialized country's R&D and technology transfer," MPRA Paper 41473, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Bernstein, Paul M. & Montgomery, W. David & Rutherford, Thomas F., 1999. "Global impacts of the Kyoto agreement: results from the MS-MRT model," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3-4), pages 375-413, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Astrid KRENZ, "undated". "Modeling the Interaction Between Industries and Services Sectors´ Agglomeration in the European Union," EcoMod2010 259600098, EcoMod.

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