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Back on Track?: Savings Puzzles in EU-Accession Countries

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  • Mechthild Schrooten
  • Sabine Stephan

Abstract

After the collapse in the early years of transition, saving rates in many EU-accession countries have recovered and remained stable during recent years. This may indicate that the transformation process has come to an end with regard to savings. Is saving behaviour in EU-accession countries now driven by the same forces as it is in market economies? We use a panel data set covering the years 1990 to 1999 to estimate fixed-effects models for domestic and private saving ratios. Central findings: saving is highly persistent; income, growth and institutional reforms cause saving to increase, whereas public saving crowds out private saving. Domestic saving and foreign capital are operating as substitutes. (

Suggested Citation

  • Mechthild Schrooten & Sabine Stephan, 2002. "Back on Track?: Savings Puzzles in EU-Accession Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 306, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp306
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Abdur R Chowdhury, 2004. "Private Savings in Transition Economies: Are there Terms of Trade Shocks?," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, pages 487-514.
    2. Agnese Bicevska & Aleksejs Melihovs & Krista Kalnberzina, 2009. "Savings in Latvia," Discussion Papers 2009/01, Latvijas Banka.
    3. repec:sos:sosjrn:170208 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Radulescu, Magdalena, 2006. "The Impact of the National Bank of Romania's Monetary Policy on the Banking Credits, the Domestic Savings and Investments (As Compared to the Other Central and Eastern European Countries)," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 3(2), pages 10-31, June.
    5. Aleksander Aristovnik & Andrej Kumar, 2006. "Some Characteristics of Sharp Current Account Deficit Reversals in Transition Countries," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 4(1), pages 9-45.
    6. Aleksander Aristovnik, 2006. "Current Account Reversals and Persistency in Transition Regions," Zagreb International Review of Economics and Business, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb, vol. 9(1), pages 1-43, May.
    7. Aleksander Aristovnik, 2005. "Twin Deficits Hypothesis And Horioka-Feldstein Puzzle In Transition Economies," International Finance 0510020, EconWPA.
    8. Aleksander Aristovnik, 2005. "Current Account Reversals In Selected Transition Countries," International Finance 0510021, EconWPA.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Panel data; savings; EU-accession countries; transformation;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies

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