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Transitions from home to marriage of young Americans

Author

Listed:
  • Arnstein Aassve

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Simon Burgess
  • Andrew Chesher
  • Carol Propper

Abstract

The paper examines the impact of income on the transitions between home, living independently and first marriage of young Americans. A matching model is outlined, similar to that used in theories of job search, to explain the probability of marriage and living alone. A multiple state, multiple transition model which allows for correlated heterogeneity on the first and subsequent transitions is estimated. The result show that income has a strong and significant effect. The impact of unobserved heterogeneuty is examined in detail. The impact of the young person´s earning on the transitions is explored through simulation. (AUTHORS)

Suggested Citation

  • Arnstein Aassve & Simon Burgess & Andrew Chesher & Carol Propper, 2001. "Transitions from home to marriage of young Americans," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-004, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2001-004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Moffitt, Robert, 1990. "The effect of the U.S. welfare system on marital status," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 101-124, February.
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    3. George A. Akerlof & Janet L. Yellen & Michael L. Katz, 1996. "An Analysis of Out-of-Wedlock Childbearing in the United States," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 277-317.
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    5. Nancy Cole & Janet Currie, 1994. "Reported Income in the NLSY: Consistency Checks and Methods for Cleaningthe Data," NBER Technical Working Papers 0160, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Haurin, Donald R & Hendershott, Patric H & Kim, Dongwook, 1993. "The Impact of Real Rents and Wages on Household Formation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(2), pages 284-293, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Arnstein Aassve, 2000. "Economic resources and single motherhood: incidence and resolution of premarital childbearing among young American women," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2000-015, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. David Blanc & François-Charles Wolff, 2006. "Leaving Home in Europe: The Role of Parents’ and Children’s Incomes," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 53-73, March.
    3. Arnstein Aassve & Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Matt Dickson, 2006. "Employment, family union and childbearing decisions in Great Britain," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 781-804.
    4. Arnstein Aassve & Francesco C. Billari & Stefano Mazzuco & Fausta Ongaro, 2001. "Leaving Home Ain't Easy. A comparative longitudinal analysis of ECHP data," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-038, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Gatskova, Kseniia & Kozlov, Vladimir, 2018. "Doubling Up or Moving Out? The Effect of International Labor Migration on Household Size," CEI Working Paper Series 2017-6, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    6. Yuet-Yee Wong, Linda & Yu, Qiqing, 2007. "A bivariate interval censorship model for partnership formation," Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 370-383, February.
    7. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2008. "Leaving Home: What Economics Has to Say about the Living Arrangements of Young Australians," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 41(2), pages 160-176, June.
    8. Dan Anderberg, 2001. "An Equilibrium Analysis of Marriage, Divorce and Risk-Sharing," CESifo Working Paper Series 555, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Hendrik Thiel & Stephan L. Thomsen, 2015. "Individual Poverty Paths and the Stability of Control-Perception," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 794, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Michael Svarer, 2011. "Crime and partnerships," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 307-325, September.
    11. Jacob, Marita & Kleinert, Corinna, 2007. "Does unemployment help or hinder becoming independent? : the role of employment status for leaving the parental home," IAB Discussion Paper 200705, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    12. Massuanganhe, Israel Jacob, 2008. "Policies, Natural Resource Governance and Local Development," Ph.D Degree Theses 53061, University of the Free State, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    13. Nuno Martins & Ernesto Villanueva, 2006. "Does limited access to mortgage debt explain why young adults live with their parents?," Working Papers 0628, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    14. Maria Sironi & Nicola Barban & Roberto Impiacciatore, 2013. "The Role of Parental Social Class in the Transition to Adulthood: A Sequence Analysis Approach in Italy and the United States," Working Papers 059, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    15. Michael Svarer, 2007. "Working Late: Do Workplace Sex Ratios Affect Partnership Formation and Dissolution?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(3).
    16. Viola Angelini & Anne Laferrère, 2013. "Parental altruism and nest leaving in Europe: evidence from a retrospective survey," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 393-420, September.
    17. Arnstein Aassve, 2003. "The impact of economic resources on premarital childbearing and subsequent marriage among young American women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(1), pages 105-126, February.

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    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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