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Optimal Technology Policy with Imitation and Risk-Averting Households

  • Tapio Palokangas

A Schumpeterian growth model is constructed where R&D firms innovate to produce better versions of the products or imitate to copy existing innovations. Because firms cannot use their innovations or imitations as collateral, they finance their investment by issuing shares. Households save by purchasing these shares. The government affects the level of profits through competition policy. The main findings are the following. A small imitation subsidy slows down growth. In the first-best optimum collusion is socially optimal, but when the government cannot discriminate between innovation and imitation, it should promote product market competition.

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File URL: http://degit.sam.sdu.dk/papers/degit_10/C010_011.pdf
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Paper provided by DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade in its series DEGIT Conference Papers with number c010_011.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:deg:conpap:c010_011
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  1. Harris, Christopher & Howitt, Peter & Vickers, John & Aghion, Philippe, 2001. "Competition, Imitation and Growth with Step-by-Step Innovation," Scholarly Articles 12375013, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Aghion, Philippe & Harris, Christopher & Vickers, John, 1997. "Competition and growth with step-by-step innovation: An example," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 771-782, April.
  3. Zeng, J., 1995. "Innovative vs. Imitative R&D and Economic Growth," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9506, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
  4. Vesa Kanniainen & Rune Stenbacka, 2000. "Endogenous Imitation and Implications for Technology Policy," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 156(2), pages 360-, June.
  5. Carl Davidson & Paul Segerstrom, 1998. "R&D Subsidies and Economic Growth," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 29(3), pages 548-577, Autumn.
  6. Mukoyama, Toshihiko, 2003. "Innovation, imitation, and growth with cumulative technology," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 361-380, March.
  7. Cheng, Leonard K & Tao, Zhigang, 1999. "The Impact of Public Policies on Innovation and Imitation: The Role of R&D Technology in Growth Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(1), pages 187-207, February.
  8. Avinash K. Dixit & Robert S. Pindyck, 1994. "Investment under Uncertainty," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 5474, 06-2016.
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