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Maximising South Africa's Demographic Dividend

Author

Listed:
  • Morne Oosthuizen

    (Development Policy Research Unit
    Researcher)

Abstract

Based on 2005 estimates of National Transfer Accounts for South Africa, this paper investigates the resource flows across ages within the generational economy. The paper provides estimates of the lifecycle deficit and describes the financing of the deficit. The final section of the paper discusses the first and second demographic dividends and looks at potential policy options that would help the country maximise the benefit that arises through the demographic transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Morne Oosthuizen, 2013. "Maximising South Africa's Demographic Dividend," Working Papers 13157, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
  • Handle: RePEc:ctw:wpaper:13157
    as

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    File URL: http://www.dpru.uct.ac.za/sites/default/files/image_tool/images/36/DPRU%20WP13-157.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Gregg & Emma Tominey, 2004. "The Wage Scar from Youth Unemployment," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 04/097, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Stephan Klasen & Ingrid Woolard, 2009. "Surviving Unemployment Without State Support: Unemployment and Household Formation in South Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 18(1), pages 1-51, January.
    3. Arden Finn & Murray Leibbrandt & James Levinsohn, 2014. "Income mobility in a high-inequality society: Evidence from the first two waves of the National Income Dynamics Study," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 16-30, January.
    4. Alan Gelb & Taye Mengistae & Vijaya Ramachandran & Manju Kedia Shah, 2009. "To Formalize or Not to Formalize? Comparisons of Microenterprise Data from Southern and East Africa," Working Papers 175, Center for Global Development.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Canning & Sangeeta Raja & Abdo S. Yazbeck, 2015. "Africa's Demographic Transition [La transition démographique de l’Afrique]," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 22036, September.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    South Africa; National Transfer Accounts; Demographic Dividend; Lifecycle Deficit;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E01 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth; Environmental Accounts
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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