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The Continued Feminisation Of The Labour Force In South Africa

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  • Daniela Casale
  • Dorrit Posel

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  • Daniela Casale & Dorrit Posel, 2002. "The Continued Feminisation Of The Labour Force In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 70(1), pages 156-184, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:70:y:2002:i:1:p:156-184
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephan Klasen & Ingrid Woolard, 1999. "Levels, trends and consistency of employment and unemployment figures in South Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 3-35.
    2. H. Bhorat, 1999. "The October Household Survey, Unemployment and the Informal Sector: A Note," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 67(2), pages 143-146, June.
    3. Ozler, Sule, 2000. "Export Orientation and Female Share of Employment: Evidence from Turkey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1239-1248, July.
    4. Dori R. Posel & Alison Todes, 1995. "The Shift to Female Labour in Kwazulu/Natal," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 63(2), pages 125-136, June.
    5. Mehra, Rekha & Gammage, Sarah, 1999. "Trends, Countertrends, and Gaps in Women's Employment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 533-550, March.
    6. Cagatay, Nilufer & Ozler, Sule, 1995. "Feminization of the labor force: The effects of long-term development and structural adjustment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1883-1894, November.
    7. Standing, Guy, 1989. "Global feminization through flexible labor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(7), pages 1077-1095, July.
    8. Horton, Susan, 1999. "Marginalization Revisited: Women's Market Work and Pay, and Economic Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 571-582, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Bargain & Prudence Kwenda & Miracle Ntuli, 2017. "Gender bias and the intrahousehold distribution of resources: Evidence from African nuclear households in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 071, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Michael Rogan, 2016. "Gender and Multidimensional Poverty in South Africa: Applying the Global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI)," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(3), pages 987-1006, April.
    3. Sophie Mitra, 2008. "The Recent Decline In The Employment Of Persons With Disabilities In South Africa, 1998-2006," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 76(3), pages 480-492, September.
    4. Dieter von Fintel, 2017. "Institutional wage-setting, labour demand and labour supply: Causal estimates from a South African pseudo-panel," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 1-16, January.
    5. Flatø, Martin & Muttarak, Raya & Pelser, André, 2017. "Women, Weather, and Woes: The Triangular Dynamics of Female-Headed Households, Economic Vulnerability, and Climate Variability in South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 41-62.
    6. George Mutasa, 2012. "Disability Grant and Individual Labour Force Participation: The Case of South Africa," Working Papers 12156, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    7. Leibbrandt Murray & Levinsohn James A & McCrary Justin, 2010. "Incomes in South Africa after the Fall of Apartheid," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-62, January.
    8. Arden Finn & Murray Leibbrandt & Vimal Ranchhod, 2016. "Patterns of persistence: Intergenerational mobility and education in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 175, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    9. Phillips, Laura & James, Deborah, 2014. "Labour, lodging and linkages: migrant women's experience in South Africa," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59443, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Rulof Burger & Servaas Berg & Dieter Fintel, 2015. "The Unintended Consequences of Education Policies on South African Participation and Unemployment," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 83(1), pages 74-100, March.
    11. repec:rss:jnljse:v3i1p3 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:4:p:1075-:d:139572 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Pa Black, 2004. "Poverty At The Household Level," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 72(3), pages 413-436, September.
    14. Chloé van Biljon & Dieter von Fintel & Atika Pasha, 2018. "Bargaining to work: the effect of female autonomy on female labour supply," Working Papers 04/2018, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.

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