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Impacts of emission reduction policies in a multi-regional multi-sectoral small open economy with endogenous growth

  • Raouf, BOUCEKKINE

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Department of Economics)

  • Marc, GERMAIN

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE))

The burden sharing of pollution abatement costs raises the issue of how to share the costs between entities (country, region or industry) and how the pollution permits should be distributed between the parties involved. This paper explores this issue in the framework of a dynamic endogenous growth 2 sectors - 2 regions - 2 inputs Heckscher-Ohlin model of a small open multi-regional economy with an international tradable permits market. Give an “emission-based grand-fathering” sharing rule, capital accumulation is more negatively affected by the environmental policy in the energy intensive sector. We show that such a property does not necessarily hold with a “production-based grand-fathering” sharing rule. We also show that the impact on capital is likely to translate into the sectoral added value level after some time, specially if the economy is submitted to an increasingly constraining environmental policy driving up the ratio price of permits to price of energy. Finally, we show that the impact of environmental policy at the regional level depends crucially on the specialization of the region along the baseline.

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File URL: http://sites.uclouvain.be/econ/DP/IRES/2007-10.pdf
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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques in its series Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) with number 2007010.

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Length: 23
Date of creation: 01 Mar 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvec:2007010
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  1. Greenwood, J. & Hercowitz, Z. & Krusell, P., 1996. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," RCER Working Papers 420, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  2. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-37, October.
  3. Smolny, Werner, 1999. "International Sectoral Spillovers: An Empirical Analysis for German and U.S. Industries," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 135-154, January.
  4. Raouf Boucekkine & Fernando del Río & Omar Licandro, 2003. "Embodied Technological Change, Learning-by-doing and the Productivity Slowdown," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 105(1), pages 87-98, 03.
  5. Arjan Lejour & Richard Nahuis, 2005. "R&D Spillovers and Growth: Specialization Matters," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(5), pages 927-944, November.
  6. Malerba Franco & Mancusi Maria Luisa & Montobbio Fabio, 2003. "Innovation and Knowledge Spillovers: Evidence from European Data," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf0319, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.
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