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Are Feedback Factors Important In Modelling Financial Data?

  • Helena Veiga


This paper provides empirical evidence that continuous time models with one factor of volatility are, in some circumstances, able to fit the main characteristics of financial data and reports insights about the importance of introducing feedback factors for capturing the strong persistence caused by the presence of changes in the variance. We use the Efficient Method of Moments (EMM) by Gallant and Tauchen (1996) to estimate and to select among logarithmic models with one and two stochastic volatility factors (with and without feedback).

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Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Estadística y Econometría in its series Statistics and Econometrics Working Papers with number ws060101.

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Date of creation: Jan 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cte:wsrepe:ws060101
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  1. Ait-Sahalia, Yacine, 1996. "Nonparametric Pricing of Interest Rate Derivative Securities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(3), pages 527-60, May.
  2. Ronald Gallant, A. & Tauchen, George, 1999. "The relative efficiency of method of moments estimators1," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 149-172, September.
  3. Coppejans, Mark & Gallant, A. Ronald, 2002. "Cross-validated SNP density estimates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 110(1), pages 27-65, September.
  4. Diebold, Francis X. & Inoue, Atsushi, 2001. "Long memory and regime switching," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 131-159, November.
  5. Gallant, A. Ronald & Tauchen, George, 1996. "Which Moments to Match?," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(04), pages 657-681, October.
  6. Chernov, Mikhail & Ronald Gallant, A. & Ghysels, Eric & Tauchen, George, 2003. "Alternative models for stock price dynamics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 116(1-2), pages 225-257.
  7. Yacine Ait-Sahalia, 1995. "Testing Continuous-Time Models of the Spot Interest Rate," NBER Working Papers 5346, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Granger, Clive W.J. & Hyung, Namwon, 1999. "Occasional Structural Breaks and Long Memory," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt4d60t4jh, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  9. Elena Andreou & Eric Ghysels, 2002. "Detecting multiple breaks in financial market volatility dynamics," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 579-600.
  10. Michel Beine & Sébastien Laurent, 2003. "Central Bank interventions and jumps in double long memory models of daily exchange rates," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10435, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  11. Gallant, A Ronald & Rossi, Peter E & Tauchen, George, 1992. "Stock Prices and Volume," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 199-242.
  12. Brandt, Michael W. & Santa-Clara, Pedro, 2002. "Simulated likelihood estimation of diffusions with an application to exchange rate dynamics in incomplete markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 161-210, February.
  13. repec:cup:etheor:v:12:y:1996:i:4:p:657-81 is not listed on IDEAS
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