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Testing the universalism of Bourdieu's homology: Structuring patterns of lifestyle across 26 countries

Author

Listed:
  • Modesto Gayo

    (Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Sociales (ICSO); Facultad de Ciencias Sociales e Historia; Universidad Diego Portales (UDP))

  • Dominique Joye

    (Institut des sciences sociales; Faculté des sciences sociales et politiques; Université de Lausanne)

  • Yannick Lemel

    (CREST; GEMASS, Université Paris IV-Sorbonne)

Abstract

The homology idea contends that a very close relationship takes place between social positions (economic and cultural capital) and cultural practices. This idea is at the center of Pierre Bourdieu’s work La Distinction (1984[1979]) and the subsequent studies in the sociology of culture that considered this book a necessary landmark. In this paper, we use data from the International Social Survey Programme for comparing 26 countries from different geographical and cultural areas, in order to assess the homology thesis’ applicability with a large set of very different countries. Using canonical correlation analysis, our results underline how structurally similar are the wide set of countries analysed. On the one hand, we found an analogous hierarchy of activities and social positions or capitals. On the other hand, the level of association between the factorial axis defined on cultural activities and those axis calculated using capitals are also very similar.

Suggested Citation

  • Modesto Gayo & Dominique Joye & Yannick Lemel, 2018. "Testing the universalism of Bourdieu's homology: Structuring patterns of lifestyle across 26 countries," Working Papers 2018-04, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2018-04
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ineke Nagel & Yannick Lemel, 2016. "The Effects of Parents’ Lifestyle on Their Children’s Status Attainment and Lifestyle in the Netherlands," Working Papers 2016-25, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    2. Natascha Notten & Bram Lancee & Herman Werfhorst & Harry Ganzeboom, 2015. "Educational stratification in cultural participation: cognitive competence or status motivation?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 39(2), pages 177-203, May.
    3. Gayo, Modesto & Méndez, María Luisa & Teitelboim, Berta, 2016. "Tertiarization in Chile: cultural inequality and occupational structure," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    4. Fearon, James D, 2003. "Ethnic and Cultural Diversity by Country," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 195-222, June.
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