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The Impact of Changing Earnings Volatility on Retirement Wealth

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  • Austin Nichols
  • Melissa M. Favreault

Abstract

Over the last several decades, the volatility of family income has increased markedly, and own earnings volatility has remained relatively flat. Volatility may affect retirement wealth, depending on whether volatility affects accrued pension contributions or withdrawals or earnings credited toward future Social Security benefits. This project assesses the effect of the volatility of individual and family earnings on asset accumulation and projected retirement wealth using survey data matched to administrative earnings records.

Suggested Citation

  • Austin Nichols & Melissa M. Favreault, 2008. "The Impact of Changing Earnings Volatility on Retirement Wealth," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2008-14, Center for Retirement Research, revised Dec 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:crr:crrwps:wp2008-14
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    File URL: http://crr.bc.edu/working-papers/the-impact-of-changing-earnings-volatility-on-retirement-wealth/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard W. Johnson & Gordon B.T. Mermin & Dan Murphy, 2007. "The Impact of Late-Career Health and Employment Shocks on Social Security and Other Wealth," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2007-26, Center for Retirement Research, revised Dec 2007.
    2. Baker, Michael & Benjamin, Dwayne & Stanger, Shuchita, 1999. "The Highs and Lows of the Minimum Wage Effect: A Time-Series Cross-Section Study of the Canadian Law," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 318-350, April.
    3. Dynan Karen & Elmendorf Douglas & Sichel Daniel, 2012. "The Evolution of Household Income Volatility," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(2), pages 1-42, December.
    4. Haider, S. & Solon, G., 2000. "Nonrandom Selection in the HRS Social Security Earnings Sample," Papers 00-01, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
    5. repec:mpr:mprres:6064 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Jacob S. Hacker & Gregory A. Huber & Austin Nichols & Philipp Rehm & Mark Schlesinger & Rob Valletta & Stuart Craig, 2014. "The Economic Security Index: A New Measure for Research and Policy Analysis," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(S1), pages 5-32, May.

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