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Debt consolidation and fiscal stabilization of deep recessions

Author

Listed:
  • Corsetti, Giancarlo
  • Kuester, Keith
  • Meier, André
  • Müller, Gernot

Abstract

The global financial crisis of 2008-09 has sent public debt on sharply higher trajectories. With the economic recovery gradually taking hold, the focus is now shifting to fiscal "exit" strategies. Medium-term consolidation efforts are likely to include not only tax increases but also sizeable spending cuts. Our paper uses a standard new Keynesian model to show that the anticipation of such medium-term spending cuts generally enhances the expansionary effect of short-run fiscal stimulus. This conclusion still applies when monetary policy is constrained by the zero lower bound on policy rates. In this case, however, the reversal of government spending must not occur too early on the recovery path, or at least must be suitably gradual.

Suggested Citation

  • Corsetti, Giancarlo & Kuester, Keith & Meier, André & Müller, Gernot, 2010. "Debt consolidation and fiscal stabilization of deep recessions," CEPR Discussion Papers 7649, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7649
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lawrence Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2011. "When Is the Government Spending Multiplier Large?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(1), pages 78-121.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    consolidation; exit strategy; fiscal multiplier; Fiscal policy; fiscal stabilization; monetary policy; zero lower bound;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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