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Monetary and Fiscal Policy Coordination when Bonds Provide Transactions Services

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  • Canzoneri, Matthew B
  • Cumby, Robert
  • Diba, Behzad
  • López-Salido, J David

Abstract

It is commonly asserted that monetary and fiscal policy may have to be coordinated if they are to provide a nominal anchor and avoid the pathological outcomes of sunspots or explosive price paths. In this paper, we study a model in which government bonds are an imperfect substitute for money in the transactions technology, providing a new channel for debt dynamics to feed into inflation dynamics. This modification of an otherwise standard NNS model substantially alters the conditions for local determinacy and the requirements for macroeconomic policy coordination: the Taylor Principle is no longer sacrosanct; a weak fiscal response to debt is no longer the panacea for a weak monetary policy; sunspot equilibria may be less relevant than previously thought; and the need for coordination may be less than previously thought. In addition, our model provides a new way of thinking about the structural break that is thought to have occurred around 1980 in monetary policy and in the dynamics of government spending and private consumption.

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  • Canzoneri, Matthew B & Cumby, Robert & Diba, Behzad & López-Salido, J David, 2008. "Monetary and Fiscal Policy Coordination when Bonds Provide Transactions Services," CEPR Discussion Papers 6814, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6814
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Matthew Canzoneri & Robert Cumby & Behzad Diba & David López‐Salido, 2008. "Monetary Aggregates and Liquidity in a Neo‐Wicksellian Framework," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(8), pages 1667-1698, December.
    2. Tatiana Kirsanova & Simon Wren‐Lewis, 2012. "Optimal Fiscal Feedback on Debt in an Economy with Nominal Rigidities," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(559), pages 238-264, March.
    3. Dennis Bonam, 2020. "A convenient truth: The convenience yield, low interest rates and implications for fiscal policy," DNB Working Papers 700, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    4. Massimiliano Marzo & Paolo Zagaglia, 2018. "Macroeconomic Stability in a Model with Bond Transaction Services," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-27, February.
    5. Marzo, Massimiliano & Zagaglia, Paolo, 2008. "Determinacy of Interest Rate Rules with Bond Transaction Services in a Cashless Economy," Research Papers in Economics 2008:7, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    6. Stähler, Nikolai & Thomas, Carlos, 2012. "FiMod — A DSGE model for fiscal policy simulations," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 239-261.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bonds; Monetary and Fiscal Policies; Transaction Services;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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