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The Effect of Introducing a Non-redundant Derivative on the Volatility of Stock-Market Returns


  • Bhamra, Harjoat Singh
  • Uppal, Raman


We study the effect of introducing a new security, such as a non-redundant derivative, on the volatility of stock-market returns. Our analysis uses a standard, continuous time, dynamic, general-equilibrium, full-information, frictionless, Lucas endowment economy where there are two classes of agents who have time-additive power utility functions and differ only in their risk aversion. We solve for equilibrium in two versions of this economy. In the first version, risk-sharing opportunities are limited because investors can trade in only the market portfolio, which is a claim on the aggregate endowment. In the second version, agents can trade in both the market portfolio and a new zero-net-supply derivative. We show analytically that for a sufficiently small precautionary-savings effect, the introduction of a non-redundant derivative on the market increases the volatility of stock-market returns.

Suggested Citation

  • Bhamra, Harjoat Singh & Uppal, Raman, 2006. "The Effect of Introducing a Non-redundant Derivative on the Volatility of Stock-Market Returns," CEPR Discussion Papers 5726, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:5726

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Brock, W.A. & Hommes, C.H. & Wagener, F.O.O., 2009. "More hedging instruments may destabilize markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1912-1928, November.
    2. Tran, Ngoc-Khanh & Zeckhauser, Richard J., 2011. "The Behavior of Savings and Asset Prices When Preferences and Beliefs Are Heterogeneous," Working Paper Series rwp11-026, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    3. Bernard Dumas & Alexander Kurshev & Raman Uppal, 2009. "Equilibrium Portfolio Strategies in the Presence of Sentiment Risk and Excess Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(2), pages 579-629, April.

    More about this item


    general equilibrium; options; risk-sharing; volatility;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing

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