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Market Volatility and Feedback Effects from Dynamic Hedging

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  • Rüdiger Frey
  • Alexander Stremme

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the manner in which the demand generated by dynamic hedging strategies affects the equilibrium price of the underlying asset. We derive an explicit expression for the transformation of market volatility under the impact of such strategies. It turns out that volatility increases and becomes time and price dependent. The strength of these effects however depends not only on the share of total demand that is due to hedging, but also significantly on the heterogeneity of the distribution of hedged payoffs. We finally discuss in what sense hedging strategies derived from the assumption of constant volatility may still be appropriate even though their implementation obviously violates this assumption. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Inc 1997.

Suggested Citation

  • Rüdiger Frey & Alexander Stremme, 1997. "Market Volatility and Feedback Effects from Dynamic Hedging," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(4), pages 351-374.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:mathfi:v:7:y:1997:i:4:p:351-374
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    References listed on IDEAS

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