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Do doctors improve the health care of their parents? Evidence from admission lotteries

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  • Artmann, Elisabeth
  • Oosterbeek, Hessel
  • van der Klaauw, Bas

Abstract

To assess the importance of limited access to medical expertise, we exploit admission lotteries to medical school in the Netherlands to estimate the causal effects of having a child who is a doctor on parents' health outcomes. We use data on health care use and mortality of parents of 22,000 lottery participants. Results reject that health outcomes of doctors' parents differ from those of non-doctors' parents. This suggests that easy, informal access to medical expertise is not an important driver of differences in health care use and mortality. This is consistent with institutions that provide equal health care for all.

Suggested Citation

  • Artmann, Elisabeth & Oosterbeek, Hessel & van der Klaauw, Bas, 2019. "Do doctors improve the health care of their parents? Evidence from admission lotteries," CEPR Discussion Papers 14061, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:14061
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    Cited by:

    1. Frakes, Michael & Gruber, Jonathan & Jena, Anupam, 2021. "Is great information good enough? Evidence from physicians as patients," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health care use; Health inequality; Higher education; Intergenerational transmission; Medical information; Mortality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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