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Long-run Money Demand in Switzerland

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  • Gerlach, Stefan

Abstract

This paper studies long-run demand functions for Swiss M1 and M3, using annual data spanning the period 1907-2016. While the demand functions display plausible price and income elasticities, tests for structural breaks at unknown points in time detect instability in 1929 for real M1 and 1943 for real M3. This instability appears to arise from the way in which the opportunity cost is modelled. While using a single interest rate may be appropriate for M1, for M3 it would likely be helpful to take into consideration both the own return and the return on non-monetary assets.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerlach, Stefan, 2017. "Long-run Money Demand in Switzerland," CEPR Discussion Papers 12356, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12356
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cointegration; money demand; opportunity cost; Switzerland;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • N1 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations

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