IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cpr/ceprdp/10509.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Informality: Causes, Consequences and Policy Responses

Author

Listed:
  • Kanbur, Ravi

Abstract

A stylized prediction of the development economics discourse is that informality will disappear with development. And yet in the last twenty years conventional measures of informality, far from declining, have either remained stagnant or have actually increased. What exactly is informality and what are its magnitudes and trends? What are the causes of informality and why is it not decreasing as predicted by standard theories of development? What are the consequences for inclusive economic growth of a large and increasing informal sector? What are feasible and desirable policy responses to informality? These are the questions which motivate this broad based survey and overview of informality, with particular focus on India.

Suggested Citation

  • Kanbur, Ravi, 2015. "Informality: Causes, Consequences and Policy Responses," CEPR Discussion Papers 10509, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10509
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=10509
    Download Restriction: CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cai, Wenbiao & Pandey, Manish, 2013. "Size-dependent labor regulations and structural transformation in India," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 119(3), pages 272-275.
    2. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2004. "Can Labor Regulation Hinder Economic Performance? Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 91-134.
    3. Urmila Chatterjee & Ravi Kanbur, 2013. "Regulation and Non-Compliance : Magnitudes and Patterns for India's Factories Act," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16717, The World Bank.
    4. Robert E. Lucas Jr., 1978. "On the Size Distribution of Business Firms," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 9(2), pages 508-523, Autumn.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kanbur, Ravi, 2017. "The Digital Revolution and Targeting Public Expenditure for Poverty Reduction," CEPR Discussion Papers 12089, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. repec:spr:ijlaec:v:60:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s41027-017-0080-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Mirkasimov, Bakhrom & Ahunov, Muzaffar, 2017. "Labor markets and informality: the case of Central Asia," MPRA Paper 78751, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. H. Lehmann & N. Pignatti, 2018. "Informal Employment Relationships and the Labor Market: Is there Segmentation in Ukraine?," Working Papers wp1117, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    informal labour; informal sector; informality; informality and poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • J46 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Informal Labor Market
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10509. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.