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Heterogeneity and redistribution in financial crises

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  • Keiichiro Kobayashi
  • Daichi Shirai

Abstract

This paper uses a simple heterogeneous-agent economy model to show that redistribution of wealth among heterogeneous agents can play a significant role in business cycle dynamics and financial crises. In an economy where firms with heterogeneous productivity operate under borrowing constraints, redistribution of wealth reproduces the key features of business cycle fluctuations such as persistence and nonlinearity in output and labor, and procyclicality in observed productivity. This model suggests the hypothesis that a redistribution shock may be one of the key driving forces of business cycles. The aggregate variables exhibit strong nonlinearity in both our model and the standard model: however, while the behavior of individual agents does not involve nonlinearity in our model, strong nonlinearity is assumed in the standard model.

Suggested Citation

  • Keiichiro Kobayashi & Daichi Shirai, 2014. "Heterogeneity and redistribution in financial crises," CIGS Working Paper Series 14-004E, The Canon Institute for Global Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:cnn:wpaper:14-004e
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Murat Tasci & Andrea Pescatori, 2011. "Search Frictions and the Labor Wedge," IMF Working Papers 11/117, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Timothy J. Kehoe & Edward C. Prescott, 2002. "Great Depressions of the Twentieth Century," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, January.
    3. Kobayashi, Keiichiro & Inaba, Masaru, 2006. "Business cycle accounting for the Japanese economy," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 418-440, December.
    4. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1989. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 14-31, March.
    5. Timothy J. Kehoe & Edward C. Prescott(), 2007. "Great depressions of the twentieth century," Monograph, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, number 2007gdott.
    6. Enrique G. Mendoza, 2010. "Sudden Stops, Financial Crises, and Leverage," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 1941-1966, December.
    7. Robert Shimer, 2009. "Convergence in Macroeconomics: The Labor Wedge," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 280-297, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Keiichiro Kobayashi & Daichi Shirai, 2012. "Debt-Ridden Borrowers and Productivity Slowdown," CIGS Working Paper Series 14-005E, The Canon Institute for Global Studies.
    2. Daichi Shirai, 2014. "A note on hump-shaped output in the RBC model," CIGS Working Paper Series 14-009E, The Canon Institute for Global Studies.
    3. Keiichiro Kobayashi & Daichi Shirai, 2017. "Debt-Ridden Borrowers and Economic Slowdown," CIGS Working Paper Series 17-002E, The Canon Institute for Global Studies.
    4. Shirai, Daichi, 2016. "Persistence and Amplification of Financial Frictions," MPRA Paper 72187, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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