IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cmu/gsiawp/-1274648717.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Walk or Wait? An Empirical Analysis of Street Crossing Decisions

Author

Listed:
  • Mark Manuszak
  • Sanghamitra Das
  • Charles Manski

Abstract

We examine the behaviour of pedestrians wishing to cross a stream of traffic at signalized intersections. We model each pedestrian as making a discrete crossing choice by comparing the gaps between vehicles in traffic to an individual-specific 'critical gap' that characterizes the individual's minimal acceptable gap. We propose both parametric and nonparametric approaches to estimate the distribution of critical gaps in the population of pedestrians. To estimate the model, we gather field data on crossing decisions and vehicle flows at three intersections in New Delhi. The estimates provide information about heterogeneity in critical gaps across pedestrians and intersections, and permit simulation of the effect of changes in traffic light sequences on pedestrian crossing behaviour and waiting times. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Manuszak & Sanghamitra Das & Charles Manski, 2004. "Walk or Wait? An Empirical Analysis of Street Crossing Decisions," GSIA Working Papers 2003-41, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:cmu:gsiawp:-1274648717
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rust, John, 1987. "Optimal Replacement of GMC Bus Engines: An Empirical Model of Harold Zurcher," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(5), pages 999-1033, September.
    2. J. J. McCall, 1970. "Economics of Information and Job Search," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(1), pages 113-126.
    3. Mahmassani, Hani & Sheffi, Yosef, 1981. "Using gap sequences to estimate gap acceptance functions," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 143-148, June.
    4. Daganzo, Carlos F., 1981. "Estimation of gap acceptance parameters within and across the population from direct roadside observation," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 1-15, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Yang, Jianguo & Deng, Wen & Wang, Jinmei & Li, Qingfeng & Wang, Zhaoan, 2006. "Modeling pedestrians' road crossing behavior in traffic system micro-simulation in China," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 280-290, March.
    2. Avineri, Erel & Shinar, David & Susilo, Yusak O., 2011. "Pedestrians’ behaviour in cross walks: The effects of fear of falling and age," Working papers in Transport Economics 2011:18, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cmu:gsiawp:-1274648717. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Steve Spear). General contact details of provider: http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.