IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/chk/cuhkdc/00011.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Construction and Related Industries in a Changing Socio-Economic Environment: The case of Hong Kong„X

Author

Listed:
  • Charles Ka Yui Leung

    (Dept of Economics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)

  • Kelvin S. Wong

    (Dept of Real Estate and Construction, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)

Abstract

Hong Kong is well known for its "housing market bubble". Both theoretical and empirical studies point to the supply side being the "root of all evil". This paper takes a preliminary step in understanding the supply side of the Hong Kong market by investigating the construction and related industries. After taking into consideration of the unusual public expenditure, the construction industry seems to be "normal" in international standard. Its relationship with the aggregate economy is also examined. Directions for future research are also suggested.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Ka Yui Leung & Kelvin S. Wong, 2004. "The Construction and Related Industries in a Changing Socio-Economic Environment: The case of Hong Kong„X," Discussion Papers 00011, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics, revised May 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:chk:cuhkdc:00011
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.econ.cuhk.edu.hk/~discusspaper/00011.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi, 1991. "The Allocation of Capital and Time over the Business Cycle," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(6), pages 1188-1214, December.
    2. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko & Raven E. Saks, 2006. "Urban growth and housing supply," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 71-89, January.
    3. Ko Wang & Yuqing Zhou & Su Han Chan & K. W. Chau, 2000. "Over-Confidence and Cycles in Real Estate Markets: Cases in Hong Kong and Asia," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 3(1), pages 93-108.
    4. Yat-Hung Chiang & Bo-Sin Tang & Wing-Yu Leung, 2001. "Market structure of the construction industry in Hong Kong," Construction Management and Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(7), pages 675-687.
    5. Raymond Tse & Sivaguru Ganesan, 1997. "Causal relationship between construction flows and GDP: evidence from Hong Kong," Construction Management and Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 371-376.
    6. Leung, Charles, 2004. "Macroeconomics and housing: a review of the literature," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 249-267, December.
    7. Neng Lai & Ko Wang, 1999. "Land-Supply Restrictions, Developer Strategies and Housing Policies: The Case in Hong Kong," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 2(1), pages 143-159.
    8. DiPasquale, Denise, 1999. "Why Don't We Know More about Housing Supply?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 9-23, January.
    9. Ko Wang & Yuqing Zhou, 2000. "Overbuilding: A Game-Theoretic Approach," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 28(3), pages 493-522.
    10. Patrick McCloughan, 2004. "Construction sector concentration: evidence from Britain," Construction Management and Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(9), pages 979-990.
    11. Raymond Tse & C. W. Ho & S. Ganesan, 1999. "Matching housing supply and demand: an empirical study of Hong Kong's market," Construction Management and Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(5), pages 625-633.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    housing; construction; government policy; employment; investment;

    JEL classification:

    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • R0 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:chk:cuhkdc:00011. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.