IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/reesec/v28y2000i3p493-522.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Overbuilding: A Game-Theoretic Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Ko Wang
  • Yuqing Zhou

Abstract

The persistence of excess vacancy has long been documented in the literature. We propose that, because vacant land does not produce income, there is a tendency for developers to build whenever they can identify a development opportunity. Since developers have to compete with each other for the development opportunity, in the aggregate, developers will supply more units than the demand in the market. In the face of an oversupply, we show that, under certain circumstances, developers will not lower the rental rate to eliminate vacancy space. Our model also has implications for investment decisions dealing with projects that could take advantage of existing but not fully utilized assets. Copyright American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Ko Wang & Yuqing Zhou, 2000. "Overbuilding: A Game-Theoretic Approach," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 28(3), pages 493-522.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:28:y:2000:i:3:p:493-522
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Aysoy, Cem & Aysoy, Cevriye & Tumen, Semih, 2014. "Quantifying and explaining stickiness in housing rents: A Turkish case study with micro-level data," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 62-74.
    2. Andrew Haughwout & Richard W. Peach & John Sporn & Joseph Tracy, 2012. "The Supply Side of the Housing Boom and Bust of the 2000s," NBER Chapters,in: Housing and the Financial Crisis, pages 69-104 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Charles K. Leung & Kelvin S. Wong, 2004. "The Construction and Related Industries in a Changing Socio-Economic Environment: The Case of Hong Kong," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 7(1), pages 139-170.
    4. Leung, Charles, 2004. "Macroeconomics and housing: a review of the literature," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 249-267, December.
    5. Chien-An Wang & Chin-Oh Chang, 2008. "Is It a Heavy Log that Broke the Camel’s Back? Evidence of the Credit Channel in Taiwan’s Construction Industry," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 11(1), pages 38-64.
    6. Su Han Chan & Ko Wang & Jing Yang, 2011. "A Rational Explanation for Boom-and-Bust Price Patterns in Real Estate Markets," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 14(3), pages 257-282.
    7. Rose Lai & Ko Wang & Jing Yang, 2007. "Stickiness of Rental Rates and Developers’ Option Exercise Strategies," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 159-188, January.
    8. Charles Ka Yui Leung & Wei Wang, 2007. "An Examination of the Chinese Housing Market through the Lens of the DiPasquale- Wheaton Model: a Graphical Attempt," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 10(2), pages 131-165.
    9. Su Han Chan & Ko Wang & Jing Yang, 2003. "Pricing Factors in Real Estate Markets: A Simple Preference Based Approach," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 6(1), pages 102-120.
    10. Pedro M. M. L. Garcês & Cesaltina Pacheco Pires, 2011. "New housing supply: what do we know and how can we learn more?," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2011_18, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).
    11. Su Han Chan & Fang Fang & Jing Yang, 2008. "Presales, Financing Constraints and Developers?Production Decisions," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 30(3), pages 345-376.
    12. Jyh-Bang Jou & Tan Lee, 2007. "Do Tighter Restrictions on Density Retard Development?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 225-232, February.
    13. Su Chan & Ko Wang & Jing Yang, 2012. "Presale Contract and its Embedded Default and Abandonment Options," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 116-152, January.
    14. Gregory DeCoster & William Strange, 2012. "Developers, Herding, and Overbuilding," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 7-35, January.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:28:y:2000:i:3:p:493-522. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/areueea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.