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Microeconomic Evidence of Nominal Wage Rigidity in Chile

This paper presents micro evidence on the degree of downward nominal wage rigidity in Chile and also explores its consequences in terms of employment. The data used corresponds to a new panel based on 440 thousand wage histories for the period 2001.12-2007.12. The results indicate a low degree of wage flexibility, the estimated length of wage adjustment for the whole economy being around nine quarters. In terms of the determinants of wage rigidity, the degree of flexibility depends negatively on the size of the firm, the percentage of female workers, the age of workers and white-collar participation at firm level. The econometric estimations indicate that the direct consequence of wage rigidity is a higher fluctuation of employment through the business cycle.

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Paper provided by Central Bank of Chile in its series Working Papers Central Bank of Chile with number 496.

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Date of creation: Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:496
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  1. Thomas Beissinger & Christoph Knoppik, 2006. "Downward Nominal Wage Rigidity in Europe: An Analysis of European Micro Data from the ECHP 1994-2001," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 275/2006, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
  2. Castellanos, Sara G. & Garcia-Verdu, Rodrigo & Kaplan, David S., 2004. "Nominal wage rigidities in Mexico: evidence from social security records," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 507-533, December.
  3. BAI, Jushan & PERRON, Pierre, 1998. "Computation and Analysis of Multiple Structural-Change Models," Cahiers de recherche 9807, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  4. David Card & Dean Hyslop, 1997. "Does Inflation "Grease the Wheels of the Labor Market"?," NBER Chapters, in: Reducing Inflation: Motivation and Strategy, pages 71-122 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Blinder, Alan S & Choi, Don H, 1990. "A Shred of Evidence on Theories of Wage Stickiness," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 105(4), pages 1003-15, November.
  6. Julián Messina & Philip Du Caju & Cláudia Filipa Duarte & Niels Lynggård Hansen & Mario Izquierdo, 2010. "The incidence of nominal and real wage rigidity : An individual-based sectoral approach," Working Paper Research 191, National Bank of Belgium.
  7. Joseph G. Altonji & Paul J. Devereux, 1999. "The Extent and Consequences of Downward Nominal Wage Rigidity," NBER Working Papers 7236, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. McLaughlin, Kenneth J., 1994. "Rigid wages?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 383-414, December.
  9. Franz, Wolfgang & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2006. "Reasons for Wage Rigidity in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 2017, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Du Caju, Philip & Fuss, Catherine & Wintr, Ladislav, 2007. "Downward wage rigidity for different workers and firms: an evaluation for Belgium using the IWFP procedure," Working Paper Series 0840, European Central Bank.
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