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Openness and Imperfect Pass-Through: Implications for the Monetary Policy

  • Claudio Soto
  • Jorge Selaive

This paper analyzes the positive and normative implications of the degree of openness of a small economy for the transmission mechanism of monetary shocks. First, we show empirical evidence on the direct relationship between openness and the degree of exchange rate pass-through. Then, we develop a general equilibrium model where countries do not fully specialize according to their comparative advantages. With this framework we show that incomplete specialization makes the pass-through from exchange rate to import prices imperfect. The less open is the country --the less specialized- the lower is the pass-through from exchange rate to import prices. Despite the fact that the pass-through is incomplete and the expenditure switching effect is diminished, the flexible price allocation can still be reached with an inward-oriented monetary policy.

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Paper provided by Central Bank of Chile in its series Working Papers Central Bank of Chile with number 216.

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Date of creation: Jun 2003
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Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:216
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  1. Michael Devereux & Charles Engel, 2000. "Monetary Policy in the Open Economy Revisited: Price Setting and Exchange Rate Flexibiity," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 0016, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
  2. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1997. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1243-1272, September.
  3. Charles Engel, 1999. "Local-Currency Pricing and the Choice of Exchange-Rate Regime," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 0036, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
  4. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth Rogoff, 2000. "New Directions for Stochastic Open Economy Models," International Finance 0004002, EconWPA.
  5. Roberts, Mark J & Tybout, James R, 1997. "The Decision to Export in Colombia: An Empirical Model of Entry with Sunk Costs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(4), pages 545-64, September.
  6. Sebastian Edwards, 1997. "Openness, Productivity and Growth: What Do We Really Know?," NBER Working Papers 5978, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Ariel T. Burstein & Joao C. Neves & Sergio Rebelo, 2000. "Distribution Costs and Real Exchange Rate Dynamics During Exchange-Rate-Based-Stabilizations," NBER Working Papers 7862, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Maurice Obstfeld and Kenneth Rogoff., 1995. "Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C95-048, University of California at Berkeley.
  9. Bodnar, Gordon M. & Gentry, William M., 1993. "Exchange rate exposure and industry characteristics: evidence from Canada, Japan, and the USA," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 29-45, February.
  10. Lane, P, 1999. "The New Open Economy Macroeconomics: A Survey," Trinity Economics Papers 993, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  11. Charles Engel, 2002. "Expenditure Switching and Exchange Rate Policy," NBER Working Papers 9016, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Friberg, Richard & Nydahl, Stefan, 1999. "Openness and the Exchange Rate Exposure of National Stock Markets," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 4(1), pages 55-62, January.
  13. Betts, Caroline & Devereux, Michael B., 2000. "Exchange rate dynamics in a model of pricing-to-market," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 215-244, February.
  14. Devereux, Michael B & Engel, Charles M, 2000. "Monetary Policy In The Open Economy Revisited: Price Setting Rules And Exchange Rate Flexibility," CEPR Discussion Papers 2454, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Betts, Caroline & Devereux, Michael B., 1996. "The exchange rate in a model of pricing-to-market," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 1007-1021, April.
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