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The Demand for FactChecking

Author

Listed:
  • Chopra, Felix

    (University of Bonn)

  • Haaland, Ingar

    (University of Bergen and CESifo)

  • Roth, Christopher

    (University of Warwick, briq, CESifo, CEPR, CAGE)

Abstract

Using a large-scale online experiment with more than 8,000 U.S. respondents, we examine how the demand for a politics newsletter changes when the newsletter content is fact-checked. We first document an overall muted demand for factchecking when the newsletter features stories from an ideologically aligned source, even though fact-checking increases the perceived accuracy of the newsletter. The average impact of fact-checking masks substantial heterogeneity by ideology: factchecking reduces demand among respondents with strong ideological views and increases demand among ideologically moderate respondents. Furthermore, factchecking increases demand among all respondents when the newsletter features stories from an ideologically non-aligned source.

Suggested Citation

  • Chopra, Felix & Haaland, Ingar & Roth, Christopher, 2021. "The Demand for FactChecking," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 563, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cge:wacage:563
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fact-checking; News Consumption; Information; Media Bias; Belief Polarization JEL Classification: D83; D91; L82;
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