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The Out of Africa Hypothesis of Comparative Economic Development: Common Misconceptions

Author

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  • Quamrul H. Ashraf
  • Oded Galor
  • Marc P. B. Klemp

Abstract

The importance of the prehistoric migration of anatomically modern humans from Africa for comparative economic development has been the focus of a vibrant research agenda in the past decade. This influential literature has attracted the attention of some scholars from other disciplines, and in light of existing methodological gaps across fields, has perhaps unsurprisingly generated some significant misconceptions. This article examines the critical views expressed by some scholars from other disciplines, and establishes that they are based on fundamental misunderstandings of the statistical methodology, the conceptual framework, and the scope of the analysis that characterize this influential literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Quamrul H. Ashraf & Oded Galor & Marc P. B. Klemp, 2019. "The Out of Africa Hypothesis of Comparative Economic Development: Common Misconceptions," CESifo Working Paper Series 7453, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7453
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp7453.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cemal Eren Arbatlı & Quamrul H. Ashraf & Oded Galor & Marc Klemp, 2015. "Diversity and Conflict," NBER Working Papers 21079, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Cemal Eren Arbath & Quamrul H. Ashraf & Oded Galor & Marc Klemp, 2019. "Diversity and Conflict," Working Papers 2019-9, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    3. Depetris-Chauvin, Emilio & Özak, Ömer, 2018. "The Origins of the Division of Labor in Pre-modern Times," MPRA Paper 84894, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Cemal Eren Arbatli & Quamrul Ashraf & Oded Galor, 2013. "The Nature of Civil Conflict," Working Papers 2013-15, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    5. C. Justin Cook & Jason M. Fletcher, 2018. "High-school genetic diversity and later-life student outcomes: micro-level evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 307-339, September.
    6. Quamrul H. Ashraf & Oded Galor & Marc Klemp, 2018. "Interpersonal Diversity and Socioeconomic Disparities Across Populations: A Reply to Rosenberg and Kang," Working Papers 2018-14, Brown University, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Quamrul H. Ashraf & Oded Galor & Marc Klemp, 2018. "Interpersonal Diversity and Socioeconomic Disparities Across Populations: A Reply to Rosenberg and Kang," Working Papers 2018-14, Brown University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    comparative development; interpersonal population diversity; the out of Africa hypothesis;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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