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Trade Union Membership and Influence 1999-2009

Author

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  • Alex Bryson
  • John Forth

Abstract

This paper analyses the continued decline of trade unions in Britain and examines the possible implications for workers, employers, and unions themselves. Membership of trade unions declined precipitously in the 1980s and 1990s. The rate of decline has slowed in the most recent decade, but we find that unions remain vulnerable to further erosion of their membership and influence.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Bryson & John Forth, 2010. "Trade Union Membership and Influence 1999-2009," CEP Discussion Papers dp1003, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1003
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John T. Addison & Claus Schnabel (ed.), 2003. "International Handbook of Trade Unions," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2705.
    2. John W. Budd & Karen Mumford, 2004. "Trade Unions and Family-Friendly Policies in Britain," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(2), pages 204-222, January.
    3. David Card & Thomas Lemieux & W. Craig Riddell, 2003. "Unionization and Wage Inequality: A Comparative Study of the U.S, the U.K., and Canada," NBER Working Papers 9473, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Brown , W. & Bryson , A. & Forth , J., 2008. "Competition and the Retreat from Collective Bargaining," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0831, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
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    Cited by:

    1. Veliziotis, Michail, 2010. "Trade unions and unpaid overtime in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-43, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Dan Coffey & Carole Thornley, 2014. "Shock, awe and continuity: Mrs Thatcher's legacy for the public sector," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(3), pages 195-213, May.
    3. Mirella Damiani & Fabrizio Pompei & Andrea Ricci, 2013. "Wages and Labour Productivity: the role of performance-related pay in Italian firms," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 124/2013, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
    4. Mirella Damiani & Fabrizio Pompei & Andrea Ricci, 2016. "Performance related pay, productivity and wages in Italy: a quantile regression approach," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 344-371, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    trade unions; wages; holidays; workplace performance;

    JEL classification:

    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance

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