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Impacts of decentralised power generation on distribution networks: a statistical typology of European countries

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  • Darius Corbier
  • Frédéric Gonand
  • Marie Bessec

Abstract

The development of decentralised sources of power produced out of renewable energies has been triggering far-reaching consequences for DSOs over the past decade. Our paper benchmarks across more than 20 European countries the impact of the development of renewables on the physical characteristics of power distribution networks and on their investments. It builds quantitative indicators about the dynamics of installed capacity of and generation from renewable sources of electricity, electric independence, quality of electric distribution, the amount of smart grids investments, DSOs capital expenditures, the length of the distribution networks, overall costs of power networks paid by private agents, and electric losses, all in relation with the development of decentralised generation. The heterogeneity of these indicators across Europe appears to be wide notably because of physical constraints, historic legacies or policy and regulatory choices. A cluster analysis allows for deriving 5 groups of countries that display statistically homogenous characteristics. Our results may provide decision makers and regulators with a tool helping them to concentrate on the main issues specific to their countries as compared to the European median, and to look for possible solutions in the experience of other clusters which are shown to perform better for some indicators.

Suggested Citation

  • Darius Corbier & Frédéric Gonand & Marie Bessec, 2015. "Impacts of decentralised power generation on distribution networks: a statistical typology of European countries," Working Papers 1509, Chaire Economie du climat.
  • Handle: RePEc:cec:wpaper:1509
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Renewables; Electric utilities; Distribution networks; Cluster analysis.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources

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