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Tax Reforms in an Endogenous Growth Model with Pollution



This paper discusses the effects of a green tax reform in an AK growth model without abatement activities and with a negative environmental externality in utility function. There is also a non-optimal level of public spending. The results depend on the financing source of public spending. When there is not public debt, a revenue-neutral green tax reform has not any effect on pollution, growth and welfare. On the contrary, when short-run deficits are financed by debt issuing, a variety of green tax reforms increase welfare. Nevertheless, in this framework, non-green tax reforms are also welfare improving.

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  • Esther Fernández & Rafaela Pérez Sánchez & Jesús Ruiz, 2003. "Tax Reforms in an Endogenous Growth Model with Pollution," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2003/31, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  • Handle: RePEc:cea:doctra:e2003_31

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    1. Christian Scholz & Georg Ziemes, 1999. "Exhaustible Resources, Monopolistic Competition, and Endogenous Growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(2), pages 169-185, March.
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    3. Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Growth: With or Without Scale Effects?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 139-144, May.
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    11. Cleveland, Cutler J. & Ruth, Matthias, 1997. "When, where, and by how much do biophysical limits constrain the economic process?: A survey of Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen's contribution to ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 203-223, September.
    12. Poul Schou, 2000. "Polluting Non-Renewable Resources and Growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 16(2), pages 211-227, June.
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    More about this item


    Environmental externalities; Economic growth; Pollution taxes; Laffer Curve.;

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

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