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Bikesharing across the Globe

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  • Shaheen, Susan
  • Guzman, Stacey
  • Zhang, Hua

Abstract

Concerns about global climate change, energy security, and unstable fuel prices have caused many decision makers and policy experts worldwideto closely examine the need for more sustainable transportation strate- gies. Sustainable strategies include clean fuels, vehicle technologies, trans- portation demand management, and integrated land use and transportation strategies (Shaheen and Lipman 2007). Bikesharing—the shared use of a bicycle fleet—is one mobility strategy that could help address many of these concerns. In recent years, interest in this evolving concept has spread across the globe. At present, there are an estimated 135 programs in approximately 160 cities around the world with more than 236,000 bicycles on four continents and over 35 more planned in 16 nations in 2011.

Suggested Citation

  • Shaheen, Susan & Guzman, Stacey & Zhang, Hua, 2012. "Bikesharing across the Globe," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt0qm296pf, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:itsrrp:qt0qm296pf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pucher, J. & Dijkstra, L., 2003. "Promoting Safe Walking and Cycling to Improve Public Health: Lessons from The Netherlands and Germany," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 93(9), pages 1509-1516.
    2. Shaheen, Susan A & Cohen, Adam P & Chung, Melissa S, 2009. "North American Carsharing: A Ten Year Retrospective," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt2cm9d512, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
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    1. Médard de Chardon, Cyrille & Caruso, Geoffrey & Thomas, Isabelle, 2016. "Bike-share rebalancing strategies, patterns, and purpose," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 22-39.
    2. J. Christopher Westland & Jian Mou & Dafei Yin, 2018. "Prediction of Shared Bicycle Demand with Wavelet Thresholding," Papers 1802.02683, arXiv.org.
    3. Lazarus, Jessica & Pourquier, Jean Carpentier & Feng, Frank & Hammel, Henry & Shaheen, Susan, 2020. "Micromobility evolution and expansion: Understanding how docked and dockless bikesharing models complement and compete – A case study of San Francisco," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).
    4. Lazarus, Jessica & Pourquier, Jean Carpentier & Feng, Frank & Hammel, Henry & Shaheen, Susan, 2020. "Micromobility evolution and expansion: Understanding how docked and dockless bikesharing models complement and compete – A case study of San Francisco," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt96g9c9nd, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    5. Parkes, Stephen D. & Marsden, Greg & Shaheen, Susan A. & Cohen, Adam P., 2013. "Understanding the diffusion of public bikesharing systems: evidence from Europe and North America," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 94-103.
    6. Lovelace, Robin & Beecham, Roger & Heinen, Eva & Vidal Tortosa, Eugeni & Yang, Yuanxuan & Slade, Chris & Roberts, Antonia, 2020. "Is the London Cycle Hire Scheme becoming more inclusive? An evaluation of the shifting spatial distribution of uptake based on 70 million trips," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 1-15.
    7. Yanjie Ji & Xinwei Ma & Mingyuan Yang & Yuchuan Jin & Liangpeng Gao, 2018. "Exploring Spatially Varying Influences on Metro-Bikeshare Transfer: A Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(5), pages 1-23, May.
    8. Audikana, Ander & Ravalet, Emmanuel & Baranger, Virginie & Kaufmann, Vincent, 2017. "Implementing bikesharing systems in small cities: Evidence from the Swiss experience," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 18-28.
    9. Parkes, Stephen & Mardsen, Greg & Shaheen, Susan PhD & Cohen, Adam, 2013. "Understanding the Diffusion of Public Bikesharing Systems: Evidence from Europe and North America," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt3qr9h2pr, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    10. Zhang, Hua & Shaheen, Susan PhD & Chen, Xingpeng, 2013. "Bicycle Evolution in China: From the 1900s to the Present," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt05k9k6b6, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.

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