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Manitoba’s Demographic Challenge: Why Improving Aboriginal Education Outcomes Is Vital for Economic Prosperity

  • Colin Busby

    (C.D. Howe Institute)

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    As a wave of babyboomers retire, the upcoming decade will see only a modest expansion in Manitoba’s available workforce, and most of this net increase will depend on job-seeking young Aboriginals. Policy reforms should encourage more Aboriginal students to finish high school. Smart reforms to financial aid for postsecondary education would demonstrate aid availability to students early in their academic careers. This would bolster student educational aspirations during secondary studies for those on the margins of accessing postsecondary education. With large numbers of Aboriginal high-school dropouts, Manitoba cannot, and should not, rely solely on expanding international immigration to boost workforce growth.

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    Paper provided by C.D. Howe Institute in its series e-briefs with number 99.

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    Length: 8 pages
    Date of creation: May 2010
    Date of revision:
    Publication status: Published on the C.D. Howe Institute website, May 2010
    Handle: RePEc:cdh:ebrief:99
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    1. Andrew Sharpe & Jean-François Arsenault, 2010. "Investing in Aboriginal Education in Canada: An Economic Perspective," CSLS Research Reports 2010-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    2. Frenette, Marc, 2007. "Why Are Youth from Lower-income Families Less Likely to Attend University? Evidence from Academic Abilities, Parental Influences, and Financial Constraints," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2007295e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
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