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Congestive Traffic Failure: The Case for High-Occupancy and Express Toll Lanes in Canadian Cities

Author

Listed:
  • Benjamin Dachis

    (C.D. Howe Institute)

Abstract

Congestion on Canadian highways is having a significant negative economic impact on major Canadian cities. Rather than face the political challenge of introducing road tolls to discourage traffic, governments have chosen to build carpool lanes on urban highways, despite evidence that these lanes have limited effectiveness in curbing congestion. Policymakers in major Canadian cities need realistic options for reducing the economic cost of congestion and increasing revenue for transportation infrastructure: converting carpool to HOT lanes would fit those needs.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Dachis, 2011. "Congestive Traffic Failure: The Case for High-Occupancy and Express Toll Lanes in Canadian Cities," e-briefs 122, C.D. Howe Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdh:ebrief:122
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    File URL: https://www.cdhowe.org/beating-the-traffic-jam-blues-the-hot-option-for-reducing-road-congestion-and-raising-revenues-c-d-howe-institute/14562
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Floater, Graham & Rode, Philipp & Friedel, Bruno & Robert, Alexis, 2014. "Steering urban growth: governance, policy and finance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60776, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Ben Dachis, 2013. "Cars, Congestion and Costs: A New Approach to Evaluating Government Infrastructure Investment," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 385, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Urban Issues Series; high-occupancy toll lanes (HOT lanes); highway congestion; Canada;

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy

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