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Steering urban growth: governance, policy and finance

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  • Floater, Graham
  • Rode, Philipp
  • Friedel, Bruno
  • Robert, Alexis

Abstract

We live in an urban age. Over half the world’s population now lives in urban areas, while the urban population is expected to reach 60% by 2030. At the same time, the importance of cities for national economic growth and climate change continues to increase. Three groups of cities will be particularly important for the global economy and climate: Emerging Cities, Global Megacities and Mature Cities. When combined, these 468 cities are projected to contribute over 60% of global GDP growth and over half of global energy-related emissions growth between 2012 and 2030 under business as usual. However, not all countries and cities will benefit from the potential economic gains of urban growth under business as usual. The winners and losers of urban expansion will depend on the policy decisions that national and sub-national governments make over the next few years. Evidence suggests that urban growth that is poorly managed by governments can lead to a range of economic, social and environmental costs, such as traffic congestion, inefficient public transport, air pollution with associated health impacts, and inadequate infrastructure for basic services such as energy, water and waste.

Suggested Citation

  • Floater, Graham & Rode, Philipp & Friedel, Bruno & Robert, Alexis, 2014. "Steering urban growth: governance, policy and finance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60776, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:60776
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/60776/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Toparlar, Y. & Blocken, B. & Maiheu, B. & van Heijst, G.J.F., 2017. "A review on the CFD analysis of urban microclimate," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 1613-1640.
    2. Floater, Graham & Rode, Philipp & Robert, Alexis & Kennedy, Chris & Hoornweg, Dan & Slavcheva, Roxana & Godfrey, Nick, 2014. "Cities and the New Climate Economy: the transformative role of global urban growth," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60775, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook

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