IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bsl/wpaper/2017-13.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Dynamic heterogeneous R&D with cross-technologies interactions

Author

Listed:
  • Bondarev, Anton
  • Krysiak, Frank C.

Abstract

In many countries, inducing large-scale technological changes has become an important policy objective, as in the context of climate policy or energy transitions. Such large-scale changes require the development of strongly interlinked technologies. But current economic models have little flexibility for describing such linkages. We present a model of induced technological change that covers a fairly large set of cross-technology interactions and that can describe a wide variety of long-run developments. Using this model, we analyse and compare the development induced by optimal fifrm behaviour and the socially optimal dynamics. We show that the structure of cross-technology interactions is highly important. It shapes the dynamics of technological change in the decentralised and the socially optimal solution, including the prospects of continued productivity growth. It determines whether the decentralised and the socially optimal solution have similar or qualitatively difffferent dynamics. Finally, it is highly important for the question whether simple r&d policies can induce effifficient technological change.

Suggested Citation

  • Bondarev, Anton & Krysiak, Frank C., 2017. "Dynamic heterogeneous R&D with cross-technologies interactions," Working papers 2017/13, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2017/13
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/61304/1/20180306094845_5a9e55ed930e8.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pietro Peretto & Sjak Smulders, 2002. "Technological Distance, Growth And Scale Effects," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(481), pages 603-624, July.
    2. Fischer, Carolyn & Parry, Ian W. H. & Pizer, William A., 2003. "Instrument choice for environmental protection when technological innovation is endogenous," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 523-545, May.
    3. Anton Bondarev, 2012. "The long-run dynamics of product and process innovations for a multi-product monopolist," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(8), pages 775-799, November.
    4. Chu, Angus C. & Cozzi, Guido & Galli, Silvia, 2012. "Does intellectual monopoly stimulate or stifle innovation?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 727-746.
    5. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
    6. Sjak Smulders, 1995. "Entropy, environment, and endogenous economic growth," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 2(2), pages 319-340, August.
    7. Acemoglu, Daron & Cao, Dan, 2015. "Innovation by entrants and incumbents," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 255-294.
    8. Pietro Peretto & Michelle Connolly, 2007. "The Manhattan Metaphor," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 329-350, December.
    9. Cellini, Roberto & Lambertini, Luca, 2002. "A differential game approach to investment in product differentiation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 51-62, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bondarev, Anton, 2018. "Heterogeneous R&D spillovers and sustainable growth: Limits to efficient regulation," Working papers 2018/04, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    technological spillovers; social optimality; market inefficiency; optimal control; heterogeneous innovations;

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • C02 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Mathematical Economics
    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2017/13. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (WWZ). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wwzbsch.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.