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Domestic financial regulation and external borrowing

  • Lanau, Sergi

    ()

    (International Monetary Fund)

This paper studies the relationship between domestic financial regulation and the incentive of non-banks to borrow from banks abroad using BIS banking data in a gravity framework. Conditional on a large set of macroeconomic controls, we find that under tighter domestic financial regulation non-banks borrow more abroad. Non-banks in a country on the upper quartile of a financial deregulation index borrow 21%–28% more than non-banks in a country with minimum regulation. The finding also holds for more disaggregated regulation measures. Interest rate controls and entry barriers to the banking sector are the most relevant types of regulation. The results in this paper indicate that international borrowing and lending is a prominent element to be taken into account in designing financial stability tools.

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File URL: http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/research/Documents/workingpapers/2011/wp429.pdf
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Paper provided by Bank of England in its series Bank of England working papers with number 429.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 31 May 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0429
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  1. Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Laeven, Luc & Levine, Ross, 2004. "Regulations, Market Structure, Institutions, and the Cost of Financial Intermediation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 36(3), pages 593-622, June.
  2. Sergio L. Schmukler & Graciela Laura Kaminsky, 2003. "Short-Run Pain, Long-Run Gain; The Effects of Financial Liberalization," IMF Working Papers 03/34, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Andrew K. Rose & Mark M. Spiegel, 2004. "A Gravity Model of Sovereign Lending: Trade, Default, and Credit," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 51(s1), pages 50-63, June.
  4. Sa, Filipa & Towbin, Pascal & wieladek, tomasz, 2011. "Low interest rates and housing booms: the role of capital inflows, monetary policy and financial innovation," Bank of England working papers 411, Bank of England.
  5. Enrica Detragiache & Abdul Abiad & Thierry Tressel, 2008. "A New Database of Financial Reforms," IMF Working Papers 08/266, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Enrica Detragiache & Gianni De Nicoló & Senay Agca, 2007. "Financial Reforms, Financial Openness, and Corporate Borrowing; International Evidence," IMF Working Papers 07/186, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Portes, Richard & Rey, Helene & Oh, Yonghyup, 2001. "Information and capital flows: The determinants of transactions in financial assets," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 783-796, May.
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