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The Impact of Development on CO2 Emissions: A Case Study for Bangladesh until 2050

Author

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  • Bernhard G. Gunter

    (American University and Bangladesh Development Research Center)

Abstract

Bangladesh, a country with a population of 160 million, is currently contributing 0.14 percent to the world’s emission of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, mostly due to a growing population and economic growth (which both lead to an increase in energy consumption), Bangladesh’s share in CO2 emissions is—despite the increasing use of alternative energy—expected to rise sharply. This study uses the example of Bangladesh to illustrate the impact of low-income countries’ energy neutral development on global CO2 emissions in 2050 by using a set of alternative assumptions for population growth and GDP growth. It also shows how complex the determinants for (a) gains in energy efficiency and (b) changes in carbon intensity are in low-income countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernhard G. Gunter, 2010. "The Impact of Development on CO2 Emissions: A Case Study for Bangladesh until 2050," Bangladesh Development Research Working Paper Series (BDRWPS) BDRWPS No. 10, Bangladesh Development Research Center (BDRC).
  • Handle: RePEc:bnr:wpaper:10
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    File URL: http://www.bangladeshstudies.org/files/WPS_no10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stern,Nicholas, 2007. "The Economics of Climate Change," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521700801, May.
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    3. World Bank & International Monetary Fund, 2009. "Global Monitoring Report 2009 : A Development Emergency," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 2625.
    4. World Bank, 2008. "World Development Indicators 2008," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 28241.
    5. World Bank, 2008. "World Development Indicators 2008," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 11855.
    6. Khandker, Shahidur R. & Barnes, Douglas F. & Samad, Hussain A., 2009. "Welfare impacts of rural electrification : a case study from Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4859, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zaman, Rubaiya, 2012. "CO2 Emissions, Trade Openness and GDP Percapita : Bangladesh Perspective," MPRA Paper 48515, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    climate change; carbon dioxide emission; Bangladesh; Copenhagen Accord;
    All these keywords.

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