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The Impact of Development on CO2 Emissions: A Case Study for Bangladesh until 2050

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  • Bernhard G. Gunter

    (American University and Bangladesh Development Research Center)

Abstract

Bangladesh, a country with a population of 160 million, is currently contributing 0.14 percent to the world’s emission of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, mostly due to a growing population and economic growth (which both lead to an increase in energy consumption), Bangladesh’s share in CO2 emissions is—despite the increasing use of alternative energy—expected to rise sharply. This study uses the example of Bangladesh to illustrate the impact of low-income countries’ energy neutral development on global CO2 emissions in 2050 by using a set of alternative assumptions for population growth and GDP growth. It also shows how complex the determinants for (a) gains in energy efficiency and (b) changes in carbon intensity are in low-income countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernhard G. Gunter, 2010. "The Impact of Development on CO2 Emissions: A Case Study for Bangladesh until 2050," Bangladesh Development Research Working Paper Series (BDRWPS) BDRWPS No. 10, Bangladesh Development Research Center (BDRC).
  • Handle: RePEc:bnr:wpaper:10
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    File URL: http://www.bangladeshstudies.org/files/WPS_no10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. York, Richard & Rosa, Eugene A. & Dietz, Thomas, 2003. "STIRPAT, IPAT and ImPACT: analytic tools for unpacking the driving forces of environmental impacts," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 351-365, October.
    2. Khandker, Shahidur R. & Barnes, Douglas F. & Samad, Hussain A., 2009. "Welfare impacts of rural electrification : a case study from Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4859, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zaman, Rubaiya, 2012. "CO2 Emissions, Trade Openness and GDP Percapita : Bangladesh Perspective," MPRA Paper 48515, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    climate change; carbon dioxide emission; Bangladesh; Copenhagen Accord;
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