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I want YOU! An experiment studying motivational effects when assigning distributive power

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  • Jordi Brandts
  • Werner Güth
  • Andreas Stiehler

Abstract

Will the fact that a person is selected among others on the basis of personal information affect that person's behavior? In our experiment participants first answer a personality questionnaire. They then play a 3-person game: one of the three players decides, after inspecting the personality questionnaires, between an outside option and granting allocation power over a pie to one of the other two players. Treatments differ in the procedure by which distribution power is assigned: to a randomly determined or to a knowingly selected partner. Results show that knowingly selected allocators keep less for themselves than randomly selected ones. We also find evidence that knowingly selected allocators treat selectors more generously than the third player. However, these effects become weaker over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Jordi Brandts & Werner Güth & Andreas Stiehler, 2004. "I want YOU! An experiment studying motivational effects when assigning distributive power," Working Papers 129, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bge:wpaper:129
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    File URL: https://www.barcelonagse.eu/sites/default/files/working_paper_pdfs/129.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary Charness & Matthew Rabin, 2002. "Understanding Social Preferences with Simple Tests," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(3), pages 817-869.
    2. Bohnet, Iris & Frey, Bruno S., 1999. "The sound of silence in prisoner's dilemma and dictator games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 43-57, January.
    3. Charness, Gary & Gneezy, Uri, 2008. "What's in a name? Anonymity and social distance in dictator and ultimatum games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-35, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Abbink & Matthew Ellman, 2004. "The donor problem," Economics Working Papers 796, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jan 2005.

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