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The Bank of Canada’s 2009 Methods-of-Payment Survey: Methodology and Key Results

  • Carlos Arango
  • Angelika Welte

The authors present the methodology and main findings of the Bank of Canada’s 2009 Methods-of-Payment survey, a detailed investigation of consumer payment behaviour in Canada. The survey targeted the 18- to 75-year-old Canadian resident population. During November 2009, participants answered a questionnaire about their demographics, personal finance, and payment instrument habits and perceptions. Of the 6,868 questionnaire respondents, about half also completed a 3-day shopping diary, recording close to 16,000 shopping transactions. The survey gives a detailed account of Canadians’ cash management habits and payment instrument choices and provides important clues into the reasons why Canadians pay the way they do.

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File URL: http://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/dp2012-06.pdf
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Paper provided by Bank of Canada in its series Discussion Papers with number 12-6.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bca:bocadp:12-6
Contact details of provider: Postal: 234 Wellington Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0G9, Canada
Phone: 613 782-8845
Fax: 613 782-8874
Web page: http://www.bank-banque-canada.ca/

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  1. Schmidt, Tobias, 2011. "Fatigue in payment diaries - empirical evidence from Germany," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,11, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  2. Arango, Carlos & Huynh, Kim P. & Sabetti, Leonard, 2011. "How do you pay? The role of incentives at the point-of-sale," Working Paper Series 1386, European Central Bank.
  3. Ben Fung & Kim Huynh & Leonard Sabetti, 2012. "The Impact of Retail Payment Innovations on Cash Usage," Working Papers 12-14, Bank of Canada.
  4. Carlos Arango & Varya Taylor, 2008. "Merchants' Costs of Accepting Means of Payment: Is Cash the Least Costly?," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2008(Winter), pages 17-25.
  5. Peter Mooslechner & Helmut Stix & Karin Wagner, 2006. "How Are Payments Made in Austria?," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 2, pages 111–134.
  6. Carlos Arango & Dylan Hogg & Alyssa Lee, 2012. "Why Is Cash (Still) So Entrenched? Insights from the Bank of Canada’s 2009 Methods-of-Payment Survey," Discussion Papers 12-2, Bank of Canada.
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