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The 2015 and 2016 diaries of consumer payment choice: technical appendix

Author

Listed:
  • Marco Angrisani
  • Kevin Foster
  • Marcin Hitczenko

Abstract

This document serves as the technical appendix to the 2015 and 2016 editions of the Diary of Consumer Payment Choice (DCPC) administered by the Center for Economic and Social Research. The DCPC is a study designed primarily to collect data on financial transactions over a three-day period by U.S. consumers ages 18 and older. In this data report, we detail the technical aspects of the survey design, implementation, and analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Angrisani & Kevin Foster & Marcin Hitczenko, 2018. "The 2015 and 2016 diaries of consumer payment choice: technical appendix," Research Data Report 18-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbdr:18-2
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    File URL: https://www.frbatlanta.org/-/media/documents/banking/consumer-payments/research-data-reports/2018/the-2015-and-2016-diaries-of-consumer-payment-choice-technical-appendix/rdr1802.PDF
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Marcin Hitczenko, 2015. "Identifying and evaluating sample selection bias in consumer payment surveys," Research Data Report 15-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Marco Angrisani & Kevin Foster & Marcin Hitczenko, 2017. "The 2012 diary of consumer payment choice: technical appendix," Research Data Report 17-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    3. Claire Greene & Shaun O'Brien & Scott Schuh, 2017. "U. S. consumer cash use, 2012 and 2015: an introduction to the Diary of Consumer Payment Choice," Research Data Report 17-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    4. Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse, 2009. "The impact of survey design on research outcomes: A case study of seven pilots measuring cash usage in the Netherlands," DNB Working Papers 221, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    5. Marco Angrisani & Kevin Foster & Marcin Hitczenko, 2017. "The 2015 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice: technical appendix," Research Data Report 17-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    6. Alexander Shapiro & Jos Berge, 2002. "Statistical inference of minimum rank factor analysis," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 67(1), pages 79-94, March.
    7. Schmidt, Tobias, 2011. "Fatigue in payment diaries - empirical evidence from Germany," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,11, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    8. Naeem Ahmed & Matthew Brzozowski & Thomas Crossley, 2006. "Measurement errors in recall food consumption data," IFS Working Papers W06/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    Cited by:

    1. Claire Greene & Joanna Stavins, 2020. "The 2017 Diary of Consumer Payment Choice," Consumer Payments Research Data Reports 2018-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    survey design; sample selection; survey cleaning; raking; poststratification estimates;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance

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